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Difference between revisions of "Tryon Creek Inner Loop Hike"

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=== Guidebooks that cover this hike ===
 
=== Guidebooks that cover this hike ===
 
* ''Take a Walk: Portland'' by Brian Barker
 
* ''Take a Walk: Portland'' by Brian Barker
 +
* ''Urban Trails: Portland'' by Eli Boschetto
 
* ''60 Hikes within 60 Miles of Portland'' by Paul Gerald
 
* ''60 Hikes within 60 Miles of Portland'' by Paul Gerald
 
* ''100 Hikes in Northwest Oregon'' - 4th Edition, by William Sullivan
 
* ''100 Hikes in Northwest Oregon'' - 4th Edition, by William Sullivan
 +
* ''Best Trail Runs: Portland, Oregon'' by Adam W. Chase, Nancy Hobbs, and Yassine Dibboun
 
* ''Oregon Nature Weekends'' by Jim Yuskavitch
 
* ''Oregon Nature Weekends'' by Jim Yuskavitch
 
* ''Trail Running: Oregon'' by Lizann Dunegan
 
* ''Trail Running: Oregon'' by Lizann Dunegan

Latest revision as of 18:15, 26 December 2018

A feeder creek along the Cedar Trail (Martell)
Tryon Creek (Martell)
Terry Riley Bridge is a bouncy suspension bridge (Martell)
Some of the trail junctions look like freeway interchanges (Martell)

Contents

Hike Description

The easiest way to see Tryon Creek State Park is to grab a map at the visitors center which is located at the main trailhead and explore on your own schedule, heading back to the trailhead when you are ready. There isn't really anything other than the creek itself that is a "must-see", so any hike you do, you won't have to walk away feeling like you missed something. However, for those who are interested, we describe a guided hike below that covers a good chunk of the park.

If you are planning to hike in the area, you may want to strongly consider bringing shoes that you don't mind getting muddy, and possibly a clean change for the car. The park has special trails for bicyclists and horses, and is also popular with joggers. If you want the illusion of a little more solitude, you may want to start at one of the smaller trailheads.

To follow our guided hike, as you leave the parking lot and head towards the Nature Center turn left on the Old Main Trail towards the Red Fox Trail. Turn left at the Red Fox Trail and cross over the Red Fox Bridge. Keep right after crossing the bridge to connect with the Cedar Trail. Continue on the slightly less busy Cedar trail heading back towards Tryon Creek. At a large intersection of trails (shown on the right side of this page), head towards the creek through the intersection and then turn left on Middle Creek Trail towards High Bridge following the creek.

After crossing High Bridge, bear right to follow the Middle Creek Trail up the bluff to turn left on the Maple Ridge Trail. Take this trail around to the Nature Center.

Maps

Regulations or Restrictions, etc.

  • Open 7am to dusk (exact hours change seasonally)
  • No fees required.
  • Horses allowed on some trails.
  • Dogs are allowed on 6’ leash only, and you must clean up after them (bags provided).

Trip Reports

Related Discussions / Q&A

Guidebooks that cover this hike

  • Take a Walk: Portland by Brian Barker
  • Urban Trails: Portland by Eli Boschetto
  • 60 Hikes within 60 Miles of Portland by Paul Gerald
  • 100 Hikes in Northwest Oregon - 4th Edition, by William Sullivan
  • Best Trail Runs: Portland, Oregon by Adam W. Chase, Nancy Hobbs, and Yassine Dibboun
  • Oregon Nature Weekends by Jim Yuskavitch
  • Trail Running: Oregon by Lizann Dunegan

More Links

Contributors

Oregon Hikers Field Guide is built as a collaborative effort by its user community. While we make every effort to fact-check, information found here should be considered anecdotal. You should cross-check against other references before planning a hike. Trail routing and conditions are subject to change. Please contact us if you notice errors on this page.

Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this field guide is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this field guide. All content posted on the field guide becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.