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Difference between revisions of "Sutton Mountain Hike"

From Oregon Hikers Field Guide

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* Backpackable: Yes, but no water available
 
* Backpackable: Yes, but no water available
 
* Crowded: No
 
* Crowded: No
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[[Image:Suttonview.jpg|thumb|600px|The view from Sutton Mountain ''(Cheryl Hill)'']]
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[[Image:Suttonhedgehog.jpg|thumb|400px|Hedgehog cactus blooming on Sutton Mountain "((Cheryl Hill)"]]
  
 
=== Hike Description ===
 
=== Hike Description ===

Revision as of 15:03, 1 June 2017


  • Start point: Sutton Mountain TrailheadRoad.JPG
  • End point: Sutton Mountain
  • Trail Log: Trail Log
  • Hike Type: Out-and-back
  • Distance: 8 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1500 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Seasons: Spring and Fall
  • Family Friendly: Yes
  • Backpackable: Yes, but no water available
  • Crowded: No
The view from Sutton Mountain (Cheryl Hill)
Hedgehog cactus blooming on Sutton Mountain "((Cheryl Hill)"

Contents

Hike Description

This hike in the Sutton Mountain Wilderness Study Area is great in the spring when the wildflowers are blooming. It follows an old road for the entire way except the last tiny bit. Even though it's technically a road hike, it doesn't feel like one most of the time. Avoid this hike in summer when the temperatures are scorching.

From the trailhead, walk north along a cow lane that follows a fenceline, heading towards a gate in the trees. Walk around the gate and continue following the lane, which is rough and chewed-up from cows. The path turns sharply left just before an area of private barns and buildings.

Follow the old grassy road as it heads uphill beside a dry gully. Follow the road as it curves to the right, crossing the dry gully, and doubling back as it continues climbing. In May look for lupine, milk vetch, and other wildflowers blooming here.

The road flattens out and curves to the left and the views start really opening up. The road stays level for awhile and on clear days you can see the tip of Mt. Hood off in the distance. Wildflowers are abundant along this stretch in the spring.

The road passes through a gateway (there is no longer an actual gate). The path may get a bit faint here, but ahead is a fence that heads uphill to the left. On the other side of that fence the road turns sharply uphill. You will also see a path going straight, which you are welcome to explore, but this hike will take you to the left. The road may be faint and pretty grassy at times through this stretch as you hike up, but if you look carefully it's there.

You will see two humps of Sutton Mountain ahead of you. The one on the right is the true summit. As you approach, the old road does not actually go up there but skirts along the shoulder of the slope. To get up to the summit you will need to go cross-country. Up at the top are a few hardy juniper trees and an incredible view that includes distant Mt. Jefferson, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Adams. You can also see the Painted Hills below the summit to the west. If your timing is right in the spring you will also see numerous hedgehog cactus in bloom up here.

Return the way you came.

Maps

Fees, Regulations, etc.

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Guidebooks that cover this hike

  • 100 Hikes / Travel Guide Eastern Oregon, third edition, by William L. Sullivan


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Contributors

Oregon Hikers Field Guide is built as a collaborative effort by its user community. While we make every effort to fact-check, information found here should be considered anecdotal. You should cross-check against other references before planning a hike. Trail routing and conditions are subject to change. Please contact us if you notice errors on this page.

Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this field guide is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this field guide. All content posted on the field guide becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.