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Difference between revisions of "Sumpter Valley Interpretive Hike"

From Oregon Hikers Field Guide

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* Trail Log:  
 
* Trail Log:  
 
* Hike Type: Out-and-back
 
* Hike Type: Out-and-back
{{Distance|1 Mile}}
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{{Distance|0.5 miles}}
* High Point: 7,873 feet
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* High Point: 5,250 feet
 
{{Elevation gain|100 feet}}
 
{{Elevation gain|100 feet}}
 
{{Difficulty|Easy}}
 
{{Difficulty|Easy}}
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=== Hike Description ===
 
=== Hike Description ===
The trail heads through the trees, winding gently down the slope. At the bottom are railroad tracks and several interpretive signs. Make a left and following the trail as it passes a piece of a railroad equipment and more signs before it loops back to rejoin the main trail.
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The Sumpter Valley Railway was established in 1890 and when completed it stretched between Prairie City and Baker City. Trains transported feed, seed, equipment, and logs over the mountains. But better roads resulted in a decline in rail traffic and the last run occurred in 1947. A tourist train operates on a six-mile segment of the line between McEwan Depot and Sumpter Station, but here at Dixie Summit you can hike on a portion of old rail bed and learn about the history of the railroad, as well as the switchback system needed to get trains down the steep grade.
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The trail heads through the trees, winding gently down the slope through a recent burn. At the bottom are railroad tracks and several interpretive signs explaining the history of the railroad and the Dixie Switchback. Make a left and follow the trail as it passes a piece of a railroad equipment and more signs before it loops back to rejoin the main trail. Return the way you came.
  
  
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=== Maps ===
 
=== Maps ===
{{Hikemaps|latitude=44.3187|longitude=-118.2854}}
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{{Hikemaps|latitude=44.53682|longitude=-118.59772}}
  
  
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=== More Links ===
 
=== More Links ===
 
* [https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/malheur/recarea/?recid=40170  Sumpter Valley Interpretive Trail #260 (USFS)]
 
* [https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/malheur/recarea/?recid=40170  Sumpter Valley Interpretive Trail #260 (USFS)]
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* [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumpter_Valley_Railway The Sumpter Valley Railway (Wikipedia)]
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* [https://sumptervalleyrailroad.org/ Sumpter Valley Railroad (tourist train)]
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* [http://www.abandonedrails.com/Sumpter_Valley_Railroad The Sumpter Valley Railway]
  
  
 
=== Page Contributors ===
 
=== Page Contributors ===
 
* [[justpeachy|justpeachy]] (creator)
 
* [[justpeachy|justpeachy]] (creator)

Revision as of 01:02, 12 June 2018


Contents

Hike Description

The Sumpter Valley Railway was established in 1890 and when completed it stretched between Prairie City and Baker City. Trains transported feed, seed, equipment, and logs over the mountains. But better roads resulted in a decline in rail traffic and the last run occurred in 1947. A tourist train operates on a six-mile segment of the line between McEwan Depot and Sumpter Station, but here at Dixie Summit you can hike on a portion of old rail bed and learn about the history of the railroad, as well as the switchback system needed to get trains down the steep grade.

The trail heads through the trees, winding gently down the slope through a recent burn. At the bottom are railroad tracks and several interpretive signs explaining the history of the railroad and the Dixie Switchback. Make a left and follow the trail as it passes a piece of a railroad equipment and more signs before it loops back to rejoin the main trail. Return the way you came.


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Page Contributors

Oregon Hikers Field Guide is built as a collaborative effort by its user community. While we make every effort to fact-check, information found here should be considered anecdotal. You should cross-check against other references before planning a hike. Trail routing and conditions are subject to change. Please contact us if you notice errors on this page.

Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this field guide is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this field guide. All content posted on the field guide becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.