Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

This is a forum for trip reports that pre-date the Portland Hikers forum, trail photos from pre-digital era, or any other discussions that focus on trail history.
Lurch
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Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Lurch » May 20th, 2011, 2:46 pm

So I've been paroozing the Oregonian Archives, and digging up some interesting articles from way back in the days where the Mazamas topping Angels Rest was a news worthy event.

I know landmarks have shifted and adjusted over the years, and finding those old names have always been interesting to me. I secretly hope to uncover some long lost gem of the gorge that was common knowledge a hundred years ago ;)

There are two in my recent wanderings that I don't seem to recognize. One article (below) references landmarks progressing east along the OCRHwy.
After passing Bridal Veil [...] One passes Minnie Falls, Angels Rest, Mist Falls, Gordon Falls, and Multnomah Falls...
minniefalls.JPG
Another mentions Catherine's Dome (next to St Peters) and what appears to be Pierce Creek Falls, somewhere in Multnomah County, visible from the highway.

Catherines Dome sounds familiar, and I may have that marked on one of my maps somewhere, but does anyone know about pierce creek or minnie falls?

Lurch
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Lurch » May 20th, 2011, 2:52 pm

Scratch that, I believe Pierce Creek is McCord... one down!

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Stevefromdodge
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Stevefromdodge » May 20th, 2011, 3:22 pm

Gordon Falls is Wahkeena.

If Minnie Falls is west of Angel's Rest and east of Bridal Veil it would have to be Coopey Falls or Sheppard's Dell. Coopey Falls was named after the original landowner.

Shepperd's Dell was donated to the state as a tribute to his wife. Unfortunately, it looks like his wife's name was Matilda and she went by Mattie.

Looks like there's a trove of fun info at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ormultno/index.htm

Lurch
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Lurch » June 7th, 2011, 2:23 pm

Alrighty! I've uncovered a few more name changes/origins/lost places. To make things easier on me I'm just going to copy the text and list things out, rather than try and save and post jpgs of original articles... Some of these have been posted, but so far as I know there isn't a "list" of any sorts.
  • On Perdition Trail
    • Flat Fir Point - Western most viewpoint, moss covered rock with a wind blown fir flattened against the stone just below it. (1921)
    • Alter of the Gods - A great pile of rocks, resembling an ancient place of worship. The alter tops a sheer cliff of several hundred feet. A panorama of the Columbia Gorge is possible from this point. (1921)
    • Lonesome Corner - Is off the main trail and is reached by a short side path. The corner is a tiny shelf of rock from which Multnomah Falls may be viewed from the west side. A cable has been anchored in the rocks and placed around a huge fir tree so that visitors may enjoy this hazardous spot with some degree of comfort. (1921)
  • In 1915 points along the OCRH were renamed by the Mazamas and OHS.
    • Deadman Creek - Just east of the Multnomah County line has changed its name to Ruckel Creek, in honor of J.S. Ruckel one of the original owners of the portage road around the Cascades of the Columbia.
    • Metlako Falls - Named after the Indian legendary goddess of salmon
    • Mount Wauna - Named from the legend of the Bridge of the Gods
    • Wahclella Falls - For the Indian tribe that dwelt along the river near Bonneville and the Cascades
    • Mount Munra - In honor of "Grandma" Munra, who for years kept the railroad eating-house at Bonneville and who is one of Oregon's widely-known pioneer women. The name Mount Munra already is used locally around Bonneville.
    • Wahe Falls - an Indian name of the locality.
    • Mount Wauneka - an Indian name of the locality
    • McCord Creek - In honor of W. R. McCord, a pioneer who built the first fish wheels near the mouth of the stream.
    • Elowah Falls - Native name for the location
    • Devil's Slide Creek - Name was changed to Tumalt Creek in honor of old Tumalt, who was an Indian of the Wahclella tribe, and rendered material aid to some of the white settlers escaping the Cascades Massacre in 1856. Upon returning in the heat of the excitement following the defeat of the Indians by the troops, was executed as a participant of the uprising.
    • Yeon Mountain - Named for the very obvious reason that Mr. Yeon has given so much time and money in the construction of the highway and should have his name attached to some prominent feature.
    • Levens Creek - Directly east of St. Peters Dome
    • Katani Rock - From the Indian word meaning "Place of rocks"
    • Mount Kiesano - Cliffs in the SE corner of Section 3 T1N R6E will be known as Mount Kiesano. Kiesano was the last chief of the Multnomah Tribe.
    • Winema Pinnacles - The high pinnacles between Oneonta Gorge and Multnomah Falls. A Lutuamian word for "Chieftaness" and applicable because of a mythical tale in which a maiden rallied her tribesmen and inflicted defeat on a band of invaders. She fell in the battle, and Talapus raised the pinnacles where she fell.
    • Mount Talapus - Renamed from Shellrock Mtn, as there is already a Shellrock Mountain near Wyeth. Talapus is a legenadry diety of the Indians represented by the coyote.
    • Mount Nesmith - The highest point immediately adjacent to the Columbia River between Portland and The Dalles was named in honor of Oregon's pioneer Indian fighter and Senator, Colonel James W. Nesmith, a pioneer of 1843.
    • Cub Peak - Name changed to Palmer Peak in honor of General Joel Palmer, and Oregon pioneer. The first known person to attempt an ascent of Mt. Hood in 1843. (Succeeded in reaching Crater Rock)
    • Gordon Falls - Renamed to Wahkeena Falls. This was done for the reason that there is another Gordon Creek about three miles away flowing into the Sandy River, and a Gorton Creek at Wyeth.
  • Looksee Point - Shown on the map below in an article published in 1919. I believe this would be Vista Point right now
  • Eagle Eyrie - Appears to be todays Devil's Rest
  • Thor's Heights - aka Thor's Point, Throw's Crown and Cape Eternity, currently known as Crown Point
  • Che-Che-op-tin - Name given to Beacon Rock by natives long before the Cascade Indians pushed them out. in 1916 the meaning had been long lost but the name remained.
  • Twahalaskie Falls - Old name for Weisendanger Falls (H.H. Riddell, 1919)
  • Cathedral Rock - "St Peters Dome" name used to be given to Yeon Mtn, when the name was change St Peters Dome was moved to replace Cathedral Rock.
  • Woutoulat - Native name for Rooster Rock
  • Coon Creek - Old name for Multnomah, (Multnomah Falls was nearly named Coon Creek Falls)
  • Wauneka Point - "Place of red sunsets"
  • Wallala Mountain - Face of Benson Plateau, never officially named. Wallala was the villiage that used to occupy the space now filled by Cascade Locks
In his 1914 description of the Columbia Highway, HH Riddel, mentions:
... Then the road pursues its way over Pierce, or Kelly Creek (soon to be renamed McCord) with it's beautiful waterfall pouring down the cliff, and through a forest of ancient fir trees, that clothe the talus sloes to the deep ravine of Moffett Creek, which the road crosses some seventy feet above the rushing stream. A half mile back from the road, this pretty stream flows through a natural tunnel just after it falls for a hundred feet off an overleap into the gorge.

I'm sure there will be more to follow, but there is my started list

Image

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Stevefromdodge
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Stevefromdodge » June 7th, 2011, 2:46 pm

Great stuff Lurch!
Lurch wrote:
  • On Perdition Trail
    • Flat Fir Point - Western most viewpoint, moss covered rock with a wind blown fir flattened against the stone just below it. (1921)
    • Alter of the Gods - A great pile of rocks, resembling an ancient place of worship. The alter tops a sheer cliff of several hundred feet. A panorama of the Columbia Gorge is possible from this point. (1921)
    • Lonesome Corner - Is off the main trail and is reached by a short side path. The corner is a tiny shelf of rock from which Multnomah Falls may be viewed from the west side. A cable has been anchored in the rocks and placed around a huge fir tree so that visitors may enjoy this hazardous spot with some degree of comfort. (1921)
I've been to Lonesome Corner and it's a stunning view. No sign remains of the cable. I've seen other sources that mention other viewpoints, but I've never been clear exactly where thet are/were.
Mount Wauna, Mount Munra, Mount Wauneka, Mount Nesmith
Now Wauna Point, Munra Point, Wauneka Point and Nesmith Point. I guess maybe "Mount" was too big to stick.


.

mandrake
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by mandrake » June 14th, 2011, 2:44 pm

Winema Pinnacles = Big Cougar & Little Cougar Rock

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Charley
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Charley » June 14th, 2011, 3:10 pm

I much prefer Eagle Eyrie to Devil's Rest. It's a lot more evocative, and it would save having to explain that it's the counterpoint to Angel's Rest.

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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by Lurch » June 20th, 2011, 11:59 pm

mandrake wrote:Winema Pinnacles = Big Cougar & Little Cougar Rock
I was thinking the same thing for awhile, but the Rock 'n' Road: An Atlas of North American Rock Climbing Areas lists Cougar Rock, Little Cougar, and Winema Pinnacles as three separate climbs.

Winema is also list as "1/2 mile east of multnomah falls". Both Cougar Rocks are a bit over a mile as the crow flies.. I'm not 100% convinced they're the same unless you've got some documentation?

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CuriousGorgeGuide
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by CuriousGorgeGuide » October 10th, 2011, 10:10 am

Well done Lurch!! I too spend an inordinate amount of pleasurable time inside the Oregonian Archive. Is it possible to post the saved PDFs of the Oregonian archive pages here on PH??....scott

mandrake
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Re: Oldschool Mystery Landmarks

Post by mandrake » October 16th, 2011, 12:27 pm

Hi Lurch,

"A Climbers Guide to the Columbia Gorge" - Mazama Annual 1958 refers to both the Cougar Rocks and Winema Pinnacles as one and the same. Article mentions that Winema is the local native American name for Chieftainess.

The article also recommends that pitons be used for protection every 10-12ft in climbing 5th class basalt. "On new explorations it is often necessary to remove quantities of rotten, outer material before pitons can be driven that will hold. A short pinch bar is recommended equipment for such work, and because of the wind updraughts in the Gorge, a pair of clear goggles is recommended to prevent the dirt that is loosened from getting in the eyes. It is very disconcerting to be working on a face or in a chimney with one hand while trying to remove dirt from the eyes with the other."

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