Best trail car/truck

Trip recommendations, current conditions, and other trail related Q&A
greenjello85
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by greenjello85 » April 22nd, 2021, 4:52 am

I had a subaru outback that I dinged the transmission on a rock and had the transmission warning light flashing WAY out past Scotts Mills. It ended up only being a solenoid and it made it back but would only drive in 1st and 3rd until I replaced it. Also, the same car got stuck early season heading up to badger lake. It was bottomed out on a short patch of snow, didn't have enough torque to spin the tires in 1st or R. I imagine newer ones have more power where this wouldn't be as much of an issue.

Now I have a 4wd Tacoma with BFG KO2 tires. Otherwise stock but goes everywhere I want to take it. I prefer remote areas and it gives me piece of mind in areas you aren't likely to run into anyone else. Good tires make all the difference for snow/ice/sharp rocks regardless of what you choose. Also, I recommend throwing in a come a long and some rope for the winter time.

Sugar Pine
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Sugar Pine » April 22nd, 2021, 6:10 am

Any opinions on a Toyota Rav4 navigating rough, deeply potholed roads? Currently have a 2006 Honda CRV which is great, but about time to get something newer.

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Crusak
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Crusak » April 22nd, 2021, 9:58 am

greenjello85 wrote:
April 22nd, 2021, 4:52 am
I had a subaru outback that I dinged the transmission on a rock and had the transmission warning light flashing WAY out past Scotts Mills. It ended up only being a solenoid and it made it back but would only drive in 1st and 3rd until I replaced it. Also, the same car got stuck early season heading up to badger lake. It was bottomed out on a short patch of snow, didn't have enough torque to spin the tires in 1st or R. I imagine newer ones have more power where this wouldn't be as much of an issue.

Now I have a 4wd Tacoma with BFG KO2 tires. Otherwise stock but goes everywhere I want to take it. I prefer remote areas and it gives me piece of mind in areas you aren't likely to run into anyone else. Good tires make all the difference for snow/ice/sharp rocks regardless of what you choose. Also, I recommend throwing in a come a long and some rope for the winter time.
I put BFG KO2 tires on my Dodge Ram 1500 last fall. Best tires I've ever had, just as you described. I agree, having good tires on a high clearance vehicle lets you get to places far off the beaten path and find solitude. 👍
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Webfoot
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Webfoot » April 22nd, 2021, 12:28 pm

Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:06 pm
the road to the top of Mt Defiance, No, and why?
Why, indeed. :lol: I'll never drive the last part of the road to Mt Defiance again. It was just one of the worst local roads I could think of. In contrast Old Barlow Road is a genuinely pleasant slow drive; I wish they would repair the bridge.
Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:06 pm
Honestly, I like what I heard about AWD/4WD from a dirt-biking friend: "Only use your AWD to get out of trouble, never into trouble." I just make sure not to get into trouble.
I've heard other forms of that, like "only use 4 Low ..." or "only use your lockers ..." and I understand the motivation for it, but 4 Low provides additional control and safety in places only 2WD is needed.

Webfoot
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Webfoot » April 22nd, 2021, 12:35 pm

Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:18 pm
I often think about the 99% problem when I see a shiny lifted pickup, with no cargo, nor any ennobling dents or scratches, at a paved trailhead. That truck, with all its shiny add-ons and engineering power, is just a waste of materials for 99% of the mileage it's driven.
Ennobling. I'll remember that for the next time someone comments on the dents, scratches, or perpetual layer of road grime, mud, and dust. :mrgreen:

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Bosterson
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Bosterson » April 22nd, 2021, 12:37 pm

Webfoot wrote:
April 22nd, 2021, 12:35 pm
Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:18 pm
I often think about the 99% problem when I see a shiny lifted pickup, with no cargo, nor any ennobling dents or scratches, at a paved trailhead. That truck, with all its shiny add-ons and engineering power, is just a waste of materials for 99% of the mileage it's driven.
Ennobling. I'll remember that for the next time someone comments on the dents, scratches, or perpetual layer of road grime, mud, and dust. :mrgreen:
That "ennobling" is also known as "beausage" (the quality of beauty from use), as coined by Grant Peterson from Rivendell Bicycle Works. :D
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Charley
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Charley » April 23rd, 2021, 11:20 pm

Webfoot wrote:
April 22nd, 2021, 12:35 pm
Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:18 pm
I often think about the 99% problem when I see a shiny lifted pickup, with no cargo, nor any ennobling dents or scratches, at a paved trailhead. That truck, with all its shiny add-ons and engineering power, is just a waste of materials for 99% of the mileage it's driven.
Ennobling. I'll remember that for the next time someone comments on the dents, scratches, or perpetual layer of road grime, mud, and dust. :mrgreen:
It might have sounded like a joke, but I sincerely mean it. :D

I really do believe that a well-loved truck, used to the fullest of its capabilities, will show wear and tear that speaks to the quality of work the truck permits its user to accomplish.

My wife's Civic, on the other hand, really just needs a car wash.

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Charley
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Charley » April 23rd, 2021, 11:23 pm

Bosterson wrote:
April 22nd, 2021, 12:37 pm
That "ennobling" is also known as "beausage" (the quality of beauty from use), as coined by Grant Peterson from Rivendell Bicycle Works. :D
I like it! On a bike, I think that would look like the quality and quantity of grease and grime that is present when a bike is rode hard and cleaned regularly. It's a certain look, right? Definitely not "dirty," but also obviously not new.

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Charley
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Charley » April 23rd, 2021, 11:32 pm

Webfoot wrote:
April 22nd, 2021, 12:28 pm
Charley wrote:
April 21st, 2021, 10:06 pm
the road to the top of Mt Defiance, No, and why?
Why, indeed. :lol: I'll never drive the last part of the road to Mt Defiance again. It was just one of the worst local roads I could think of. In contrast Old Barlow Road is a genuinely pleasant slow drive; I wish they would repair the bridge.
Ha! I drove my old Civic to the top of Table Rock in Lake County. There was a great view. . . but WHY???

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drm
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Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by drm » April 24th, 2021, 9:24 am

For all the good I've said about Subarus, it must be noted that they have a head gasket problem. The Boxer engine is great for safety and performance with a lower center of gravity, but the inherent challenge in preventing oil leaks has never been solved. If you plan to keep your car till it's old and run down and are okay checking oil and topping up once or twice between oil changes after the car reaches middle age, this is not a big problem.

But if you refuse to open the hood of your car, it can be. I know a guy with a Dodge Dakota with almost 200K on it and he says he has never opened the hood. You don't usually get away with that with a Subie. And sometimes it causes head gaskets to go. And if you want to sell it more around middle age, those leaks are easy to see on inspection. I lost a private party sale on my last 6 year old Subaru because they had an inspection and saw that it leaked oil.

Subaru has worked to make it less of a problem, but since it is inherent to the Boxer design, Subarus will always be at greater risk of it than most of the competition. I know somebody with a 2006 Outback that had their head gasket go twice in short succession. But it didn't stop them from getting another one. Two of the 4 Subarus I've owned developed this problem.

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