Best trail car/truck

Trip recommendations, current conditions, and other trail related Q&A
User avatar
Chip Down
Posts: 2511
Joined: November 8th, 2014, 8:41 pm

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Chip Down » May 11th, 2021, 1:11 pm

Congrats!
Now, to complete the initiation process, you need to get it buried up to the axles in sand or snow (which it would easily drive right through in the Jeep ads) and get it pulled out.
Yeah, I know it's a hassle, but it's mandatory. Might as well get it over with now, no point putting it off.

My first fwd vehicle was a Jeep, about as old as yours is now. Lots of fun. I miss it.

Webfoot
Posts: 1509
Joined: November 25th, 2015, 11:06 am
Location: Troutdale

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Webfoot » May 12th, 2021, 2:51 pm

sgyoung wrote:
May 10th, 2021, 8:20 pm
Honestly, I don't know. Big ones? Seemingly whatever is stock on this "sport" model of 2006 Liberty. But it has fairly new high-end all terrain tires (installed 6 months ago) and a functional spare tire on the back. It drives nicely so far, and should get its first big test in the next week or two.
I guess you're all set then. That model is listed as having 16" wheels which is preferred over 17" wheels as you have more sidewall, which soaks up bumps better and reduces the chance of rim damage when aired down. (If you don't yet have a portable compressor get one. I recommend the Viair 88P.)

I was going to recommend the BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 in LT235/70R16 size, C load range. It is a time tested moderate A/T design that is good on and off pavement.

C load range should be just right for the weight of the Liberty, and not many tires offer it. Sidewall thickness varies with brand and model but in general D and E rated LT tires will be overly stiff making the ride harsher and reducing conformity and traction, while passenger grade tires (SL, XL) will provide less than optimal puncture and pinch-flat resistance.
Chip Down wrote:
May 11th, 2021, 1:11 pm
Now, to complete the initiation process, you need to get it buried up to the axles in sand or snow (which it would easily drive right through in the Jeep ads) and get it pulled out.
Yeah, I know it's a hassle, but it's mandatory. Might as well get it over with now, no point putting it off.
:lol: It must be true. I've only been pulled out once and that was because I got off line to pull someone else out who then returned the favor.

In sand or deep snow air down to one bar (15psi) or less, corner and brake gently so you don't pop a tire off the rim, get off the gas the instant you start to bog, and carry some kind of traction mats. (I hear MaxTrax are great but they're very expensive and my cheap ones work too.)

Runnerinblack
Posts: 16
Joined: May 30th, 2017, 10:05 am
Location: Hood River, OR
Contact:

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Runnerinblack » May 12th, 2021, 8:33 pm

There is not much to add to this conversation except for my own experience.

I own a 2015 Forester that I have done some work to. Lift, wheels, tires, the works. So far, there has not been a road that I have not been able to navigate with my setup. Yes, there are times I wished I was in a 4x4 truck, but I simply took my time and picked my way down the road carefully. As far as snow it does the trick, but I am not at all confident in deep snow.

The best suggestion I have for you is this: No matter what vehicle you do get, own a full-sized spare, a tire deflator to air down, and a 12v portable compressor to air back up before you hit the road. These aren't necessary items, and the likelihood of you having to use them is slim, but that one time you don't have them.......

Webfoot
Posts: 1509
Joined: November 25th, 2015, 11:06 am
Location: Troutdale

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Webfoot » May 13th, 2021, 10:25 am

Runnerinblack wrote:
May 12th, 2021, 8:33 pm
No matter what vehicle you do get, own a full-sized spare, a tire deflator to air down, and a 12v portable compressor to air back up before you hit the road. These aren't necessary items, and the likelihood of you having to use them is slim, but that one time you don't have them.......
I was with you until "the likelihood of you having to use them is slim." Airing down is necessary for sand, makes rough roads much more comfortable, aids traction, and reduces the chance of punctures. It should be common practice.

User avatar
sgyoung
Posts: 338
Joined: November 3rd, 2013, 7:30 pm
Location: Seattle

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by sgyoung » May 15th, 2021, 9:10 pm

Thanks for the great advice, Webfoot. I appreciate it. Our tires are Backcountry All-terrain made by Dean Tires (this might a Les Schwab thing). They are well-reviewed.

The info about airing down is really great. It sounds like that will be an easy way to make bumpy rides more comfortable. When I was a kid my dad had a Jeep and we'd go off-roading sometimes. I have distinct memories of being annoyed at him for always stopping to mess with the tires because I just wanted to have fun on the dirt roads (this was in the Meadowlands of NJ, btw. What an odd place for off roading).

Webfoot
Posts: 1509
Joined: November 25th, 2015, 11:06 am
Location: Troutdale

Re: Best trail car/truck

Post by Webfoot » May 16th, 2021, 9:37 am

You're welcome. :D Remember that you probably have less sidewall and more weight than your dad's Jeep had so be careful with your rims.

A word of warning about airing down. You must not run low pressure at highway speed. Apparently you would have hazardous avoidance maneuver handling but more insidiously the rapid deep-flexing of the tire will cause it to heat up and melt internal components, risking a blow-out then or later.

Post Reply