Cairn Basin Stone Shelter

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wnshall
Posts: 103
Joined: July 17th, 2009, 10:31 am

Cairn Basin Stone Shelter

Post by wnshall » October 17th, 2020, 9:35 pm

I was hiking Sat 10/17 up in the McNeil Pt area and scrambled down into Cairn Basin. Found quite a lot of mature trees blown down -- probably 10-20. One trio landed on the Cairn Basin stone shelter.
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Stone Shelter
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Stone Shelter
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Closeup of the Stone Shelter
Here are the trees that landed on the shelter:
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The culprit
Miraculously, the shelter seems undamaged. Just needs someone to remove the trees.

More images of the blowdown:
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Blowdown in Cairn Basin
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Root balls

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OregonSurveyor
Posts: 47
Joined: August 6th, 2011, 11:21 am
Location: SE Portland (Hawthorne district)

Re: Cairn Basin Stone Shelter

Post by OregonSurveyor » October 18th, 2020, 8:08 am

Glad it looks like the shelter survived!
In the summer of 1995 my sons and I camped in the Paradise Park stone shelter, imagine my surprise when my daughters and I returned the summer after and found it completely destroyed by a direct hit from a monster fir!!
Gone are: Gnarl Ridge, Elk Cove, Ramona Falls (logs) and Paradise Park; am I forgetting any?
Jerry King
Oregon Land Surveyor (Retired)
SAR Volunteer - CSAR (Clackamas County Sheriff)

wnshall
Posts: 103
Joined: July 17th, 2009, 10:31 am

Re: Cairn Basin Stone Shelter

Post by wnshall » October 19th, 2020, 9:44 am

Isn't/wasn't there one at Cooper Spur?

Given the historic nature of the stone shelters, seems like there ought to be some effort to maintain them. Maybe there is that I'm not aware of. But the stone over the doorway (the lintel) of the shelter at McNeil is in danger of collapsing. It'd be nice to clear the downed trees off the Cairn Basin shelter.

Are there rules against maintaining or reconstructing some of these shelters? I know they don't serve much of a practical purpose anymore, but as pieces of history, as well as aesthetic objects, I think it'd be nice to at least preserve what we have. I'd even like to rebuild the Paradise park and Gnarl ridge shelters -- at least in the case of the latter, most of the stonework is still there. I suppose it's a matter of hauling lumber and tin roofing up to the site. And I suppose that's verboten in the wilderness. Seems overly restrictive to me. In my mind you can preserve the natural ecology of an area while still maintaining limited human infrastructure like trails and historic structures. (For example, it strikes me as needlessly limiting to say that trail crews can't use chainsaws to clear blowdown on trails in Wilderness areas. I just don't get it.)

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