Short hikes in the Klamath Basin 8-29-18

This forum is used to share your experiences out on the trails.
Post Reply
User avatar
bobcat
Posts: 1875
Joined: August 1st, 2011, 7:51 am
Location: SW Portland

Short hikes in the Klamath Basin 8-29-18

Post by bobcat » September 5th, 2018, 11:41 am

On our way to my wife’s home village in the northern Sierras of Plumas County, CA, we stopped to camp two nights at Collier Memorial State Park. This gave us a chance to do a few forays in the neighborhood.

Spring Creek

Spring Creek is wide enough to be called a river as it gushes forth in full force at the base of a slope only two miles from its confluence with the Williamson River. We stopped first at the Fremont-Winema National Forest’s Oux Kanee Overlook for a sweeping look down to its crystal clear waters, and then drove to the picnic area/primitive campground at its “source.” In fact, Spring Creek begins underground about 30 miles to the west and only emerges into the light of day at this point.

Spring Creek from the Oux Kanee Overlook.jpg
Pine cone mandala, Oux Kanee Overlook.jpg
Spring Creek gushes forth, Fremont-Winema N.F..jpg
Looking down Spring Creek, Fremont-Winema N.F..jpg

Collier Memorial State Park

We hiked from our campsite to the confluence of the Williamson River and Spring Creek and then up to Collier’s excellent outdoor logging museum, considered one of the best in the country. The exhibits cover the development of logging technology, from the ox carts and hand saws of the 19th century to the industrial scale clearcuts of the 20th. There are numerous high wheels on display as well as a steam donkey, solid wheel wagons, McGiffert and McVay log loaders, etc. etc. there’s also a Settlers’ Village of log dwellings and shops that have been moved here from other locations.

The Williamson River, Collier State Park.jpg
On the Williamson River Trail, Collier State Park.jpg
Fisherman at the confluence, Collier State Park.jpg
Looking up Spring Creek, Collier State Park.jpg
High wheel, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg
Old truck, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg
Solid wheel wagon and high wheels, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg
Old cabin, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg
McGiffert log loader, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg
Outhouse and wagon, Logging Museum, Collier State Park.jpg

You can hike up Spring Creek as far as a day use area, and there’s also a loop from the campground along the winding and serene Williamson River. The area is well-known for its record size Great Basin red band trout.

On the Williamson River, Collier State Park.jpg
Reflections, Williamson River, Collier State Park.jpg
Aspen grove, Collier State Park.jpg

Devils Garden from Switchback Hill

East of Collier, we were driving into the fire haze from the Watson Creek Fire, so we turned south from Sprague River and stopped at the Switchbacks Trailhead on the OC & E Woods Line State Trail. Including the Woods Line spur from Beatty to Sycan Marsh, this route (Oregon, California, and Eastern Railroad) is Oregon’s longest rails to trails conversion, a total of 95.3 miles beginning at Klamath Falls. On both sides of Switchbacks Hill, there are reverse spurs where logging trains backed up in order to negotiate the tight topography (A tunnel was planned to overcome this temporary fix but was never built). We hiked down the south slope of the hill, and then went south of the line on an abandoned forest road, passing in the process the remains of an old camp, to find the volcanic wonderland of the Devils Garden.

Abandoned rail car, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Picnic area, Switchbacks Trailhead, OC & E Line.jpg
View to the Devils Garden and Cruikshank Butte, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Gray rabbitbrush (Ericameria nauseosa), Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Bucket at old camp, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Ruins, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg

There’s a larger Devils Garden near Fort Rock and Derrick Cave. The one near Switchback Hill is a hydroclastic volcano, where the magma erupted in water and cooled in blobs and pillow breccias. A heavy dose of Mount Mazama ash was deposited 7,700 years ago, and made walking easy along dune-like pyroclastic ridges. Small windows and breccia formations, along with bonsai-like junipers, made for a fascinating exploration.

Contorted ponderosa, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
In the Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Breccia formations, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
View to Round Mountain, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Atop the Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
South ridge, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Strolling a soft ridge, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Sky window, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg

We decided to cut east to rejoin the OC & E Line, and followed a dry wash in a shallow canyon to a narrow defile guarded by two gnarly junipers. There, we picked up a cattle trail that took us through a grove of rustling aspen and back to the rail trail.

Rabbitbrush in the wash, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Looking back up the wash, Devils Garden, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg
Mile 31.5, Switchbacks, OC & E Line.jpg

Link River Trail

This was an evening hike along the Link River, which connects Upper Klamath Lake with Ewauna Lake in Klamath Falls. It is along the Link River where you find the actual “falls” which give the town its name. These are really a series of low drops and rapids much compromised by the construction of PacifiCorp’s Link River Dam in 1920, which uses two 19th century canals, the Ankeny and the Keno, to operate two power stations. PacifiCorp was going to shut these operations down because of fish remediation costs, but now functions at a reduced capacity that will ensure a better future for two endangered species, the Lost River sucker and the shortnose sucker.

Segwaying along, Link River Trail.jpg
Ripening plums, Link River Trail.jpg
Lower power plant, Link River Trail.jpg
Looking across the Link River, Link River Trail.jpg
Western pond turtle (Actinemys marmorata), Keno Canal, Link River Trail.jpg
On the Keno Canal, Link River Trail.jpg
Link River braiding, Link River Trail.jpg

Klamath Falls is, of course, known for its summer pelican flocks, and we saw plenty of these as well as cormorants, grebes, herons, egrets, geese, and ducks. The west shore of the Link River is a dense growth of plum trees and the fruit, along with a few cherries and apples, was beginning to ripen. We reached the north trailhead at Lakeshore Drive and crossed to the small park at Putnam’s Point on Upper Klamath Lake before returning the way we came.

Klamath Falls below the Link River Dam, Link River Trail.jpg
Klamath Falls (rapids) and Link River Dam, Link River Trail.jpg
Great egret (Ardea alba), Klamath Falls, Link River Trail.jpg
Pelican preening, Upper Klamath Lake, Link River Trail.jpg
Black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), Link River Trail.jpg
Boom above the dam, Upper Klamath Lake, Link River Trail.jpg
Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica), Link River Trail.jpg
Western grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis), Putnam's Point, Upper Klamath Lake.jpg
Reclining pelican, Link River Trail.jpg

User avatar
justpeachy
Posts: 2660
Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm
Location: Portland, OR
Contact:

Re: Short hikes in the Klamath Basin 8-29-18

Post by justpeachy » September 8th, 2018, 7:07 am

Nice! I was down that way in the spring. Collier was really interesting. Great museum. Hiking the old rail line from the Switchbacks Trailhead was also cool. There are some neat areas to explore down that way!
Cheryl

"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder

My adventure blog
Hiking videos
justpeachy on Instagram

Post Reply