In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch

This forum is used to share your experiences out on the trails.
Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch

Post by Steve20050 » October 29th, 2016, 11:24 pm

I have always felt an affinity to trees. When I was younger I worked around them and in them for years. I even did college work study pruning campus trees. I recall my early years of climbing the cedar tree out in front of my parents house in the California Central Valley to stare at the Sierras. I climbed trees till I was in my 40s. I just felt a peaceful existence up there. I was able to get an inside perspective if you will. I suppose at some point I realized the boy in me needed to grow up or my body was going to tell me so when I got hurt.

This year had been consumed with work. My summer had no breaks and fall was here. Those boyhood fantasies of trees to climb was coming back to haunt me. I needed a break. I decided to take action and do something about that. I took a couple weeks off work in search of the Larix lyallii or Alpine larch. Native to the eastern flanks of the northern Washington Cascades they should be easier to spot at this golden hour. It was one of two favorite fall trees that I have been able to see in their native habitat. The other being the Aruacaria araucana. While diametrically opposite, these two species achieve the same affect in the fall. The bright golden burst in color of the deciduous Alpine larch in a evergreen forest. Equally intoxicating is the Chilean pine's evergreen appearance in the fall of a deciduous lenga forest of the Andes. I'd been to Chile to see the native stands of the Aruacaria, or monkey puzzle tree. You can even find them here in Portland planted as an ornamental in some parks and yards. Wanting to walk among one of these trees in their native habitat, it was going to be much easier going to see the larch.

Most of these photos were taken with an inexpensive cybershot camera and it only works about so good. I started thinking my right eye was out of focus :lol: It is the camera. There are a couple 6X7 captures, but that is a winter project that I enjoy more these days.


Windy Pass PCT 2007.jpg
Larch trees in Windy Pass on the PCT a few years ago.
Foreign _ Chile Parque Conguillío .jpg
Araucaria trees in a fall lenga forest.
Day 1: Sept. 26th: Portland: It was time for a road trip north. I packed up way more food and gear than I could possible use. Then I bought as much firewood as I could stuff into any empty spaces for those fall nights. Blasting out of town into the gorge headed for Biggs Junction. The first day was a long drive up the eastern side of the cascades of Washington. Around 400 miles. By night I was south of Twisp on state route 97N. Open rangeland and forested hills. It is a road known more for deer suicides than scenery. The over population of deer had the causal effect of making dangerous driving conditions at night as deer were known to hurl themselves into oncoming cars. I had been on this road at night before. As fate would have it, I was once again on this road at night. I admit that some kind of karmic rules intervened. I was bent on being off this road by night and was impatient with the car rental agency and left later than I had planned. I expect that had some bearing on my predicament.

So I'm certainly not speeding on this road of a posted 60 mph. What I took for a couple locals came up behind me and I pulled off the road far enough to let them speed by. They were in a bigger hurry than I and those suicidal deer were out there. I entered one of those one house towns of forgotten name with a posted speed of 30mph. You known the ones that seem like an inconvenience to take your foot off the gas pedal, but you wonder what is lurking around the corner. A guy is sitting in his crew cab with the cab light on next to the house I passed by. Rounding a curve in the road I swerved just in time to mostly miss a large pile of brush in the road. The guys that had passed a few miles back had their vehicles off to my side of the road with one of them turned completely around. Their headlights blinding me making it harder to see what exactly was blocking the road. One young man was walking up to the pile with a look of disbelief on his face as I passed waving, shrugged and kept on going. I didn't want to get stuck in some poorly scripted plot of tit for tat in Podunkerville with local residents. I had a mission and wasn't going to be waylaid.

I stopped in Twisp, which had rolled up the sidewalks and gone to bed other than the quicky mart. I needed more ice as I wouldn't be back that way for a few days. Had a discussion with the local guy running this store about the changes occurring in the Winthrop local. He said it had gotten a lot more crazy in recent years. I supposed it was the usual suspects of a successful tourism program. This has changed other small western theme towns of the west. I had seen new million dollar homes in hills to the south before dark and expected the same for Winthrop. It seems to always be the same story. Locals wanting to have steady income turn to tourism to promote their area. Success brings as many problems as it solves with a love it to death scenario. Many locals end up leaving the area their families had been living and dying in for generations. We have all seen this happen. Myself I had seen this in Sedona, AZ, Jackson Hole, WY. to name a couple.

I headed up the Twisp River road to one of the circle the wagons campgrounds of 4 units. I was the only wagon for 3 out of 4 days there. South Fork campground wasn't much more than a round about of four tables with fire pits and an outhouse for the deal of 8 USD per night. I always go to the bank and get a bunch of 1s,5s,10s before I leave town. I know the campgrounds take checks, but who carries a check book anymore? I tell the teller I'm going camping and she laughs. I mean why 8 dollars? Why not 5 or even 10. Nope 8. Unless your sure your staying several nights you need 4 bills every day. I needed a big envelope for all the small denominations. It was late September and the nights were now growing longer than the days. The campground fire in the evening would warm my bones before bed and give me a reason to stay up past the wee hour of 8pm. I had given up backcountry fires many years ago. At this point it was headed for the middle of the night and I set up camp best one does at that hour. I was now a small walk away from the Sawtooth Wilderness.
Twisp River_South Creek campground 001.jpg
What a tidy camper. Even the firewood is shrink wrapped.
My gear included new trekking poles to try out as I had never used them. I figured here in the north cascades was about the best place to try them as everything is two directions. Up and down. My plans never included actually setting foot inside the park. I was away from regulations and permits within the park itself. The exception here as one can probably guess is the NWFP, as it is posted and required EVERYWHERE.

Day 2: Sept 27th: Louis Lake: The South Pass trail was right next to the campground. There was a junction out there that would connect me to what was supposed to be an equestrian destination, Louis Lake. As I loaded my day pack with my 40 essentials, I thought about the late great George Carlin and his monologue about "stuff". This trail was chosen as a reality check on my physical condition. The trail was surprisingly in great shape. Amazingly so was I. I powered along with my new trekking poles on the 10.5 mile RT hike. I had to see if I understood the concept of their use having watched the video in our gear section. It did seem like a natural rhythm to their use after many years of hiking. I was doing so well I picked up several hitch hikers in the form of slowly warming yellow jackets. They were warming up on my socks and were in the process of taking on an aggressive attitude as I left them beside the trail ASAP. I was soon at the lake that was wedged against a great wall of Rennie Peak.
001.jpg
One thing about equestrian trails. They have better bridges.
The first sight of the lake included the obvious equestrian camp with a mandatory carve your name in this tree. A dryish log jam greeted me at the shore and I was able to hop logs, logger style here and there with hope I didn't step on a sinker in the shallow waters. I headed away from the camp to get a panorama of the lake and surrounds. This lake was going to be tough lighting. Even the guide book admitted that the lazy fall sun wouldn't climb high enough to fully light my scene. The west end of the lake and southern slopes of some peaks on the lake had some great color. There were some larch, but most were higher up. Many were even clinging to the shaded cliffs of Rennie Peak. There was supposed to be a much smaller lake up thru the gap behind the lake and 500 feet higher. It looked like it would be a great place to go for some intrepid masochistic hiker. Not me, my days of that stuff are done. I decided to retreat to camp. Heading back I wondered if I had passed my junction? So I looked for footprints of my newish Keens trail shoes. I was the only one on this trail today and found my foot prints. I also found the Keens logo perfectly stamped on the powdery hoof churned soil. Subliminal outdoor advertisement, what's next?
002.jpg
003.jpg
Larches spotted..
004.jpg
005.jpg
This lake even had an island of its own.
006.jpg
007.jpg
008.jpg
Day 3: Sept: 28th: Copper Pass: I got up early. After all you can only sleep so many hours. Had a short drive to the end of the road. Not Roads End as the maps say, but a parking area for the trailhead. Roads End was temporarily closed for the Bull trout spawning. Fish sex. I knew all I wanted to know. The trail to Copper Pass is the same trail as the one to Twisp Pass for the first 2 miles. You see a handmade sign with arrows at a log bridge. One way points the way for hikers across the bridge. The other arrow points in the direction of a branch trail and states horses. I'll take hikers for 200 Alex. Crossed the bridge then started uphill away from my intended direction. I then went back and up the other trail to find the old Copper Pass sign imbedded in it's host tree and what appeared to be a likely horse ford of the creek. I was relieved of worries over my identity in the animal kingdom.
001.jpg


Brushy at first it was clear that the hikers were on the other trail to Twisp Pass. The trail turned to a path as it continued to climb past a twin waterfall of the North Fork of the Twisp River. Then on up through what appeared to be a couple acres of blow down. Not Opal Creek stuff where you convince yourself that the trees are log paths and you end up fifteen feet in the air. More an uphill hurdles and I was soon past it. The area was opening up and the trail turned to a rocky dry wash of sorts as it got into heather meadows and expanding views. Up in the pass it was beautiful. Views included the Copper creek drainage then off to peaks of the park Cascades, thou much of the area was taken up by views of the southeastern side of Early Winters Spires. I climbed higher on the ridge for photos, but it wasn't a sit down affair as the cold wind bit at me and I soon retreated down below the pass to a small larch grove. I believe some folks climb over this ridge headed for Twisp Pass to make a shorter loop than the loop down into the park.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 2

Post by Steve20050 » October 29th, 2016, 11:50 pm

Continued from Part 1: Copper Pass:
003.jpg
Twin waterfalls
004.jpg
005.jpg
006.jpg
007.jpg
008.jpg
009.jpg
This is the ridge you can ascend from the pass. It heads towards the Twisp Pass area. I expect some do a loop up there.
010.jpg
North Fork of Twisp River
011.jpg
I think the toothy ridge out in the distance is the Rennie Peak area above Louis Lake.
012.jpg
Early Winters Spires.
013.jpg
North Cascades Park
014.jpg
Nice grove of Larch. Kind of hard to get there from here
Day 4: Sept. 29th: Scatter Lake: Time to get serious about finding that walk among the larch. I needed to go higher as the larch generally grow higher elevation and in greater concentrations above the evergreens. At least Wikipedia states this is the case and we all know their always correct. So my choices today were Scatter or Libby lake. Both were reported with past larch sightings. Scatter Lake at just over 7000 feet won out as Libby Lake would involve several miles of driving to the trailhead following first one road then several turns onto secondary roads that I had little info on. Scatter Lake was a lazy hikers drive of about a mile back down the Twisp River road. The only questions nagging me was the guide books references to the 3900 feet of elevation gain in 4.5 miles. Also the idea that the first half was switchbacks and the second half they just gave up and went straight for the top. This proved to be a pretty accurate description.
001.jpg
Twisp River drainage from Scatter lake Trail.
002 Selfie.jpg
I don't usually do selfies, but here ya go.
I came to the conclusion several years ago while visiting the park area that the mountains in this north country contained two trail systems. One was the newer access trails of lower elevation that were pc designed for todays hikers. They connected to the higher trail systems that were old indigenous routes as well as miners and traders that only wanted to get there. These higher trails take no pity on todays hikers. My new Leki trekking poles propelled me up the switchbacks. Then I hit the steeper sections. They weren't long arduous sections. They were short steep in your face trail sections that screamed UP here. You couldn't avoid looking up and feeling a bit deflated on these sections. My poles got much shorter and I started getting winded as I struggled up these sections. I started seeing gold and wondered about my oxygen intake as delusions of the past life of a miner entered my mind. Nope. Those were the golden larch and I was headed into a prime time grove of beautiful trees.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 3

Post by Steve20050 » October 30th, 2016, 12:04 am

Continued from Part 2: Scatter Lake:
003 Camp before larch grove.jpg
004.jpg
005.jpg
006.jpg
The whole area was awash in gold and yellow hues mixed with fewer and fewer evergreens till I got to the lake.
007.jpg
008.jpg
009.jpg
Tarn just before the lake.
010.jpg
A small park of beautiful gold larch surrounded this alpine lake of aqua green and it was a fantastic spot.
010pan.jpg
011.jpg
012.jpg
013.jpg
014.jpg
Wow.
015.jpg
017.jpg
Mineralized peaks surround much of the lake. I spent the afternoon taking pictures and just hanging out appreciating what an absolute gem of a place this was. I saw two persons in the lake area that afternoon. Both were women with a dog. So much for "Man's best friend". I can't say I really blame them. Speculation and sarcasm led me to think they had enough of some guy sitting on the couch drinking a beer watching the game, saying "go fetch". I'll leave it at that.

Day 5: Sept. 30th: Moving Day: Those marshmallow clouds my photo professor used to make me save negatives for bland sky photos had been around lately. The horsetails as well. I knew all too well that low pressure was coming my way as the fading summer slipped south. If I wanted to head north into the park area I needed to leave now. My one regret here was not getting to Libby Lake. Oh, and I suppose the Cheetos thing. A small herd of 7 deer wandered thru as I was packing up to leave. What you still here?

As I drove out the Twisp River road I saw grassy hillsides that had been charred by fire near Twisp. I hadn't seen this on the way in, obviously as it was night. Neither had I seen any of this up the forested Twisp River fortunately. I got gas and headed the short distance to Winthrop and the local IGA. I'm not sure that I needed much, but I could use ice and a new roll of Charmin TP. The resident mouse had shredded my extra roll in the car trunk. (I know the campground bathrooms have paper, but really, do you use that thin government issue stuff?) I'm not entirely sure why he had done this. Perhaps it was because Mr. Whipple hadn't been around and he wanted nesting material. Or it could have been because we were feuding. He had been running around on my dinner table while I cooked. So I put out some of those hot pepper Cheetos in the car trunk, knowing he would end up there at night. The tequila was too expensive, so I settled on some Deschutes Beer. I like the Mirror Pond.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 4

Post by Steve20050 » October 30th, 2016, 12:21 am

:P Part 4: Continued from moving: Before long I was out of Winthrop and headed to the eastern edges of North Cascades National Park on WA 20. This highway isn't actually ever in the park as the corridor was left out of the park even though it passes thru the park. Make any sense? I didn't think so. I headed for the Lone Fir campground. I had stayed there before as it was close to the Cutthroat trailhead and Washington Pass not much further up the road. It's 12 USD a night. Not an even 10. Even thou the water faucets are turned off by this time of year. I would purchase several days together as to not burden the government with those 1s again. I like this campground though it's right off of WA 20. You can always tell who is speeding by the noise from the highway. It has one of the vibration strips if you cross into the center of the road. Thankfully I didn't hear any responses when people went over the center. The campground has some open area camps out in the front, but most persons prefer the back. I like the open areas out front. The high mountains around the campground block a lot of the horizon. So you get a slice of the sky. I did get afternoon sun from an open western sky, which was nice as I setup camp and just hung out with the sun and Deschutes on a warmish clear afternoon. At night time there was no moon as in the past, but I had a picture window of the Milky Way. When I got warm enough from my fire I could walk a few feet to the campground road for the night sky. I would occasional see a meteoroid streak thru my window as it got caught up in a fatal attraction with mother earth and became just another burned meteor.
Lone Fir campground_ highway 20.jpg
View of sky at Lone Fir campground.jpg
Why we had to log Lone Fir campground.jpg
Day 6: Oct 1: Maple Loop on a Saturday: Like a couple others on this site I did this 7 mile hike this year. I had put it off for years as too many folks and too popular. A couple years ago Adam did a trip report that made me think twice about not doing this beautiful hike despite the folks. So here's to you, thanks.

Up before dawn and it's cold. Froze last night. I headed up to the Liberty Bell for a panorama. I had an old 35mm chrome, but wanted something better. Who wouldn't? There are larch up there so it's a great time of year to do this. Waiting for the sun to light up those larches and I'm counting cars coming up the pass road and wondering how many are going to Rainy Pass?
001.jpg
002.jpg
I get my photos and head right over to the parking lot on the south side of Rainy pass. I'm on the trail going guide book counter clockwise and the early (wiser) folks hiking are just coming down from the other direction. I head for Heather pass and the area I want a panorama, behind the lake. By the time this is finished the numbers of hikers has grown. There is a line of sorts forming on the uphill to Maple Pass. By the way where are the Maples? So I power up my trekking poles and blast past several folks up over Maple Pass to the south side of the loop. (Another shameless plug for Leki). I expect I saw 100 persons on this 7 mile loop. A rough guess to be sure, but it was just part of this hike and actually added another dimension I usually avoid. It made it interesting none the less. It was cold in the passes and we had some serious clouds here on my 6th day. The afternoon ended with much a do about nothing. Folks had told me the weather forecast had been worse. I didn't include more than a couple photos as Robin just did a great write up on this loop.
003.jpg
004.jpg

Maple Loop 001 SAVE 24 bit.jpg
Had to add this photo. It's the classic one of the loop.
There were a lot of cars at the trailhead when I was leaving. A dog mountain with Balsamroot bloom on a Saturday type scenario. It was a Saturday and folks were out for the fall colors. I drove down to the Easy Pass trailhead to look at the situation and found 2 cars. Sunday I was heading there. On my way back I also stopped in on the Cutthroat trailhead a mile back off the road. There were about 15 vehicles.

Day 7: Oct 2: Easy Pass: Started the day late with a morning camp breakfast of Kesey's slumgullian and then drove to Mazama. My hike was an afternoon affair for lighting. I went to the general store/ sports bar/ art gallery/ what not for more stuff. I was informed that yes, I could buy beer on Sunday morning and I could drink it in the store if I wished. Don't you just love these small mountain tourist towns. I did want to get cell service as well as check a couple of future prospective trailheads in the area. I got the beer and more stuff, but the consumption would have to wait. I had places to see and didn't want to be asleep by noon.

At the trailhead the log bridge was in great shape. The boardwalks that followed were over dry fall ground that I expect was much wetter in summer.
001.jpg
002.jpg


Up thru forest with views expanding as I approached an old avalanche. The trail then switchbacks on mostly a solidified scree slope up to the pass. The trail is good and the views are better, being able to look back down towards Granite Creek and Highway 20. The mountains I was hoping to photograph were showing up with Hardy and the Golden Horn being the predominate ones I was interested in. Most of the 10? folks I saw were descending as I was ascending, so I had the pass mostly to myself. I was content to stay around the pass as it was somewhat chilly. Another hiker had told me the view was better above on the ridge, but it had been very windy and cold.
003.jpg
004.jpg
Mount Hardy on right and the Golden Horn on the left.
005.jpg
Old avalanche area of trail.
006.jpg
007.jpg
The pass area. Switch backs take you up thru the pass.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 5

Post by Steve20050 » October 30th, 2016, 1:31 am

Continued from Easy Pass:
My photo I wanted was there in the pass... I just had to wait for the ice giants of the North Cascades National Park to the west to release those clouds blocking my afternoon sun. Waiting...., wait for it... Ah come on... It was getting cold and I had exposures of foreground and background, albeit not on the same frames. I had photo shop and the ability to play god with my landscape so I prepared to leave and thanked the deities like Sahale for at least a semblance of what I wanted. So as I started my descent off the pass I got a very bright sunbeam of light across the mountains of my interest. As per another thread, I immediately thought of Repo man and the radiated Chevy Malibu. Weird. I needed to get back to the car and camp.
008.jpg
009.jpg
Easy Pass 001 SAVE 24 bit.jpg
6X7 capture while waiting around.
012.jpg
011.jpg
Peaks in the park.
014.jpg
My sunbeam. Thanks Sahale!
Day 8: Oct.3: Cutthroat Pass: I had been up on the PCT thru Cutthroat Pass years before. I had hiked up from Rainy Pass trailhead. This time I wanted to see the area from the Cutthroat trailhead. I knew there were significant groves of larch up there and even my brief visit to the trailhead the other day was full of gold and yellow ridges. It was a Monday and no cars in the parking area with sunny weather. Ranger Smith was on patrol and drove thru looking for NWFP violators.
001.jpg
Weight Limit 3 tons. I guess it's safe enough.
002.jpg
Cutthroat Pass Trail


Folks had said weather was supposed to improve so I skipped the junction to the lake thinking I'd rather be above and I could always come back and see the puddle later. The PCT trail area from Rainy Pass to Windy Pass is not part of the park. Nor is it part of a wilderness until you get near Windy Pass and you enter the Pasayten Wilderness. The Cutthroat pass trail switch backed lazily up the ridge with expanding views of the area. Sunshine was slowly crawling over the lake far below as I headed for the pass and the PCT. I was following hoof prints and piles of dung, hiker and biker tracks and thinking about this incredible scenic area. It certainly fit the thread on bikes in wilderness. With the only protection being the fame of the PCT that runs thru it and the agency charged with protection being our dubious Forest Service. Enough said.
003.jpg
Junction of Cutthroat Pass and PCT.
006.jpg
headed north on PCT. View down to Cutthroat Lake.
007.jpg
Looking north on PCT.
009.jpg
PCT view looking back south towards pass.
I got to the pass and headed north on the PCT towards Granite Pass. Thru hikers heading for the border and end of their epic trip were scattered along this beautiful trail. I was headed for some ledges above Granite Pass that had an awesome view I had briefly seen before. I had once camped there, but morning photos were filled with lite snow that year. I stayed above this pass area for a couple hours trying to capture the beautiful landscape.
010.jpg
Round the corner. This is tower mountain in the front with Golden Horn behind.
011.jpg
This was my view I was looking for. Tower mountain. Golden Horn and Mount Hardy. You can see the PCT headed north on the shoulder of Tower Mountain. Lots of fun chutes with slides out there.


Todays better weather was rapidly deteriorating as clouds of gloom started obscuring my scenery of sunny disposition. Finally the wind and cold drove me back around the corner towards Cutthroat Pass as the clouds filled in the remaining blue sky and small snowflakes blew in the wind until they wore out. I stayed up on that magic trail mile as long as I could then headed back down towards the trail head with a brief turn off to Cutthroat Lake. What I saw there in the early dusk made me promise I'd go back tomorrow. Those clouds looked like they were unlikely to leave on their own accord, with views and temperatures limited above it seemed like it was meant to be.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 6

Post by Steve20050 » October 30th, 2016, 1:59 am

Continued from Part 5: Cutthroat Pass:

Day 9: Oct4th: Cutthroat Lake: I got up semi late as occasional lite showers were passing thru during the night. Rain, real rain? Could I possibly have fallen asleep to awake in Pleasantville? I eventually headed up the road to the turnoff and proceeded to hike into Cutthroat lake. I wanted to see if my mind had been playing tricks on me yesterday as dusk approached at the lake. Once again, I was absolutely stunned. What was probably a beautiful lake at anytime of year was something else in the fall. It is one of those places you encounter that leaves an imagine imprinted in your brain you won't forget. (Well, actually I was born on Ronald Reagan's birthday so I worry sometimes about my memory or lack of, hence the photos).

This lake area was as serene in setting as it was extreme in beauty. Adding to my pleasant disposition here was the occasional showers that were lite for the most part and lack of anyone other than a very occasional person popping out of the brush. This place was heaven. I set up my camera and just hung out. I had no desire to go explore. I wanted that photo view and the place was so over the top, I didn't need to go anywhere else. I spent the whole afternoon there just mesmerized. I thought back about several times I'd passed the road turnoff in the past. Of my observations of it being just a puddle when viewed from above on the PCT. The Cutthroat trail is marked in heavy black on some maps as is Maple Loop for a reason. It far exceeded any expectations I'd had. So if your ever in the vicinity, especially in the fall, this place should be on your list, people or not.

Here's a panorama I am working on of the lake. It is (7) 6X7 photo frames spliced together and covers about 160 degrees. I had to resize the file as it is about 500mb. Then squish it into a jpeg of 1mb. Unfortunately this produces some pixels and sometimes color shift. I liken it to the round peg in a square hole. You loose a bit in the process, for what it's worth.
Cutthroat Lake _Panorama Best 001.jpg
Click on this for a bigger view.
DSC00912ps.jpg
Thankfully there is this.


Day 10: Oct. 5: Cutthroat Pass and the PCT: I was still trying to get that capture of the peaks and area above Cutthroat lake on film. I did a repeat of the hike the other day. This time there was no incentive of teasing me of a sunny day. I went into the clouds. By the horse camp about half way up, I couldn't even see the lake. There is a rough log bench and view of the lake from the cliffs by this camp. There were no views up in the pass either. I was determined to make the most of a smaller space and just hang out up there. Up and back on the PCT mile. I was waiting for a break in the weather. Some lite snowflakes as the sun played peek a boo in the early afternoon. By late afternoon I was seeing emerging peaks as the clouds swirled around them and got some shots off. Then on back down to the road before dark consumed me. I didn't have time to go back to the lake.
013.jpg
Good day for getting color of the feldspar in the area.
004.jpg
View south back to Cutthroat Pass from the PCT.
014.jpg
On my magic trail mile. Yes, I stole the expression from timberline ski lift.

015.jpg


Day 11: Oct 6: Homeward Bound: My time for larch hunting was drawing to a close. I had again thought briefly about stopping by the lake. Unfortunately I knew that if I hiked back into the lake, I would fall into a trance and be late leaving. I really didn't want to be in Seattle rush hour traffic. So I headed southwest and made it thru Seattle early then got stuck in Portland rush hour crawl across town instead. Oh joy. It was good to be back among all of you again.

I can honestly say now I know how much work these reports are. :shock: If any of you tech savy persons know how to put this sprawling report together have at it.

User avatar
retired jerry
Posts: 12775
Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Re: In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 1

Post by retired jerry » October 30th, 2016, 5:50 am

nice trip, thanks

I got to get up there some time

User avatar
bobcat
Posts: 1997
Joined: August 1st, 2011, 7:51 am
Location: SW Portland

Re: In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 6

Post by bobcat » October 30th, 2016, 6:29 pm

Cutthroat Lake - brings back memories. When my wife and I were dating, we hiked around there. Got into a huge argument out in the wilderness because I went wandering off with crucial supplies (TP). We drove out and searched for any kind of airport that she could use to fly home. Couldn't find one, and we kept driving to the Northwest Territories . . . and the rest is history.

What a quest! Glad you got your fill of Larix lyalii - and loved the account and the pictures.

I'd advise, however, to try and stitch everything together into one posting, if possible - helps with cohesion and trying to follow the story.

Steve20050
Posts: 395
Joined: November 12th, 2009, 8:06 pm

Re: In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 6

Post by Steve20050 » October 30th, 2016, 10:20 pm

bobcat wrote:Cutthroat Lake - brings back memories. When my wife and I were dating, we hiked around there. Got into a huge argument out in the wilderness because I went wandering off with crucial supplies (TP). .
I understand. When my wife and I were in Tahiti, I trapped her in a tent with a bunch of mosquitoes on Bora Bora. She wanted the bungalow and I was trying to save a lot of money. She decided she wasn't the outdoors type. I still had to get the bungalow after one night of that. So I just keep doing what I usually do, which is doing these things by myself. It has always worked for me and she doesn't mind. She understands how much better I feel when I get outdoors and be adventurous.
bobcat wrote: I'd advise, however, to try and stitch everything together into one posting, if possible - helps with cohesion and trying to follow the story.

The narrative is one draft I saved. I couldn't figure out how to load more than 15 images with the draft. So I cut up the narrative for the photo uploads. Also left out a lot of photos. I expect I should post the draft then go back and edit (upload) in the images? I don't know, as I haven't been an active trip poster. There are plenty of internet sites that don't have such great folks that I have a common interest. I just wanted to contribute. If this is fixable I could do that, just not sure how others got around this. Thanks

User avatar
miah66
Posts: 2029
Joined: July 6th, 2009, 8:00 pm

Re: In Search of Larix lyallii _ Alpine Larch Part 1

Post by miah66 » October 31st, 2016, 7:16 am

Well that was abrupt...I was hoping for more pics and narrative in this fascinating story! I had the fortune to camp out there along Twisp Road at Poplar Flat a few years back. Head to this link to see what lurks up the other fork of your trail!

Thanks for the report, hope to see/read more!
"The top...is not the top" - Mile...Mile & a Half

Instagram @pdxstrider

Post Reply