Happy Birthday!

Chat about non-hiking topics. The least serious of the forums on the site!
BigBear
Posts: 1522
Joined: October 1st, 2009, 11:54 am

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by BigBear » November 22nd, 2017, 10:03 am

I am usually pleased when I see a mylar balloon in the forest. It's such a festive bit of color and there are so few of them.

By contrast, think of the number and lack of festive atmosphere when you see:

1) the dreaded poo bag (hanging from a tree or laying trail side)
2) beer/pop can
3) candy wrapper
4) cigarette butt
5) chili, etc can
6) abandoned tent (I've seen more of these than balloons over the years)
7) geocache (so how many do you really need on a trail before dumb luck is the only tech required)


So, celebrate those birthdays and holidays and let your balloons float free I say. Make the forest a happy place once again! Power to the mylar.

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Chip Down
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Joined: November 8th, 2014, 8:41 pm

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by Chip Down » November 22nd, 2017, 5:08 pm

Texasbb: Are you sure that's a stick? In the photo, it looks like maybe a ribbon pulled taut.

BigBear: I've seen a tremendous variety of detritus on hikes, but have never encountered a tent that appeared abandoned. Where do you see such things?

Here's my most recent balloon sighting. Sometimes one has to look up to spot them.
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texasbb
Posts: 1025
Joined: July 26th, 2008, 8:16 pm
Location: Tri-Cities, WA

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by texasbb » November 22nd, 2017, 7:25 pm

Chip Down wrote:Texasbb: Are you sure that's a stick? In the photo, it looks like maybe a ribbon pulled taut.
Good eye! Yes, it's a ribbon. When I first saw it from below I thought it was a stick because it was pulled tight by the water and I wondered how it had carried the weight of a stick that far. The balloon itself was about half filled with water...I had to find the hole and squeeze it dry before packing it out.

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retired jerry
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Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by retired jerry » November 23rd, 2017, 1:07 pm

I've seen abandoned tents. And sleeping bags and such. Like maybe 10 miles into the Rogue River trail. I was a bit fearful someone would object to me being there looking at their stuff. I always wonder what the story is behind it.

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texasbb
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Joined: July 26th, 2008, 8:16 pm
Location: Tri-Cities, WA

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by texasbb » November 24th, 2017, 8:47 am

retired jerry wrote:I've seen abandoned tents. And sleeping bags and such. Like maybe 10 miles into the Rogue River trail. I was a bit fearful someone would object to me being there looking at their stuff. I always wonder what the story is behind it.
All the abandoned gear I've ever found seemed likely the result of sheer laziness. Big, heavy stuff that could have only come in by horse, left haphazardly lying around. "I can't cram this in...how'd you pack it before?" "Leave it."

But all my abandoned-gear experience is in eastern WA (Blues) where large to huge hunting parties on horseback are common. Given the popularity of the area with hunters, I guess the number of trashed camps is actually encouragingly small, but they're still balloon busters* when you happen on them.

*Does this qualify the post as on-topic? :)

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retired jerry
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Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by retired jerry » November 24th, 2017, 9:25 am

Chip started the thread but I inspired him, so I think that's on topic :)

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Chip Down
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Joined: November 8th, 2014, 8:41 pm

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by Chip Down » December 4th, 2017, 5:58 am

A few days later and I would have missed this one. Upper east side of Table Mt, which is now under snow.
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bushwhacker
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Joined: September 7th, 2009, 3:56 pm

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by bushwhacker » December 6th, 2017, 7:38 am

Happy Graduation day from the Aldrich Butte trail. You guy's need to step up your game. I am dragging these things out three at a time :evil:.
IMG_0567b.jpg
Mylar is made from 'metalicized polyester' which is basically a nylon. From what I can find nylon takes 30-40 years to degrade. Having a metal coating on it probably adds even more years to the degrading process.

Here’s a list of common items and how long they take to “break down” in the environment.

Glass bottle 1 million years
Monofilament fishing line: 600 years
Plastic beverage bottles: 450 years
Disposable diapers: 450 years
Aluminum can: 80-200 years
Boot sole: 50-80 years
Styrofoam cup: 50 years
Tin can: 50 years
Leather: 50 years
Nylon fabric: 30-40 years
Plastic film canister: 20-30 years
Plastic bag: 10-20 years (???)
Cigarette filter: 1-5 years
Wool sock: 1-5 years
Plywood: 1-3 years
Waxed milk carton: 3 months
Apple core: 2 months
Newspaper: 6 weeks
Orange or banana peel : 2-5 weeks
Paper towel: 2-4 weeks

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retired jerry
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Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by retired jerry » December 6th, 2017, 7:56 am

We need the government to regulate all businesses to replace their plastic with a version that degrades in a few years

BigBear
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Joined: October 1st, 2009, 11:54 am

Re: Happy Birthday!

Post by BigBear » December 6th, 2017, 9:39 am

Chip Down, regarding abandoned tents:

I believe the first one I saw was on the gravel road between Aldrich Butte and the base of Table Mountain about 10 years ago. The second one I recall was in Forest Park below the Wildwood Trail just north of Burnside. Then there was the full hunter's site above the Lyle Cherry Orchard trail along the road that runs along that ridgeline. There have been others, but I am not recalling the precise locations at this time.

Most recently, there was one at Gillette Lake, or at least it looked like it had been there awhile, didn't investigate its occupancy since it wasn't laying flat on the ground like the others.

The problem with the campsite abandonment is that it comes with a host of other debris left behind that is too bulky too carry out and after its been drenched by the elements, rather heavy.

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