All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Chat about non-hiking topics. The least serious of the forums on the site!
User avatar
Koda
Posts: 3442
Joined: June 5th, 2009, 7:54 am

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Koda » May 25th, 2013, 5:28 pm

kepPNW wrote: Offer stands! You too! Literally and intentionally... Name the trailhead. :D
ditto Kep. I'm probably one of the more elusive regulars here for PH's hikes, but its only because of my family, work, life balance is so busy not from a lack of interest. I know there is a great group of hikers here though and I hope to hike with you all someday.


rhetorical infographic post script
Image
lightweight, cheap, strong... pick 2

User avatar
Crusak
Posts: 3607
Joined: August 6th, 2009, 7:33 pm
Location: Oregon

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Crusak » May 25th, 2013, 5:44 pm

Regarding my previous comments... I want to make sure that I wasn't upset, or trying to make anyone else upset.

Washington County has seen a ten-fold increase in concealed handgun applications. That started in 2009 and has continued ever since. They've had to hire two additional staff members and still it's not meeting demand, so they're employing a couple of "temps" as well (to handle stuff like fingerprinting). Appointments in the CHL office when from two weeks out to three months out for new permits.

Our employees have asked people why they're getting a concealed carry permit. The answer is often that they are worried about the direction the country is headed. They see the reductions in public funding, the state of the economy, and the attempts to restrict access to firearms and it's making them nervous.

The other day I spoke with a customer at REI who asked me if I thought a waist pack he was considering would work well for concealed carry. LOL not sure why he picked me out of the crowd to ask that question. An REI employee came over and got in on the conversation. The employee told us he recently got his CHL, because "he wanted to have in in case the s**t hits the fan" and that answer surprised me. If things get really bad, no one is gonna check to see if you have a permit. :lol:

I'm not particularly worried about losing our right to bear arms in the immediate future. But I am worried about the next generation. I've looked at the UK's crime stats and compared them to crimes in the U.S. I vaguely recall that burglaries on occupied residences in the UK occur three times more often than in the U.S. something like 17% to 51% - why? Because the criminals know that the homeowners will not be armed. They're wolves among sheep. I'd hate to see future generations in the U.S. fall victim to that kind of faulty thinking. If you want a domestic example, check out the city of Chicago (where they've got very strick gun laws, and insane levels of violent crime).

I went off on a tangent there for a few sentences about "prepping" haha. To clarify: I'm not a prepper. I've talked my family into following some of the guidelines you'll find here:

http://www.co.washington.or.us/HHS/Emer ... /index.cfm

http://www.ready.gov/are-you-ready-guide

Sensible stuff and great for planning for any emergency.
Jim's Hikes

Solvitur Ambulando

User avatar
Sean Thomas
Posts: 1645
Joined: February 25th, 2012, 11:33 pm

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Sean Thomas » May 25th, 2013, 9:02 pm

This is only somewhat weapons related but I take full responsibility for chasing Koda away from the PH/TFF hikes by nearly unloading my own atomic burnt lake barf bomb in his jeep last year :(

User avatar
kepPNW
Posts: 6408
Joined: June 21st, 2012, 9:55 am
Location: Salmon Creek

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by kepPNW » May 26th, 2013, 7:04 am

Crusak wrote:he recently got his CHL, because "he wanted to have in in case the s**t hits the fan" and that answer surprised me. If things get really bad, no one is gonna check to see if you have a permit. :lol:
Ai yi yi! :roll:

It's fine displays of rational "thought," such as this, that have convinced me over the last decade or so that we ought to require anyone who wants to vote (or especially run for office!!!) that they must first pass the same citizenship test that we ask immigrants to conquer. :lol:
Karl
Back on the trail, again...

User avatar
Koda
Posts: 3442
Joined: June 5th, 2009, 7:54 am

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Koda » May 26th, 2013, 8:36 am

Sean Thomas wrote:This is only somewhat weapons related but I take full responsibility for chasing Koda away from the PH/TFF hikes by nearly unloading my own atomic burnt lake barf bomb in his jeep last year :(
lol, I'll hike with you anytime Sean. We should finish that loop we wanted, I still think it would be fun exploration to figure out a shortcut to cut out the 1825 road walk. I also think there could be a small waterfall or two in Short and Cast creek.
lightweight, cheap, strong... pick 2

User avatar
retired jerry
Posts: 13247
Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by retired jerry » May 28th, 2013, 11:09 am

Maybe the solution to most of these high profile incidents is like what happened in Albany

The perpetrator told someone who then told the authorities.

Key to this is to let people know that if someone tells you about killing people then you should take it seriously and tell someone. And that the person will be treated, not just thrown in jail.

Gun regulations or posting armed guards everywhere aren't good solutions.

User avatar
JBolt
Posts: 32
Joined: May 13th, 2013, 5:18 pm
Location: East Portland

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by JBolt » June 9th, 2013, 12:24 am

I have been offline for a bit, but just noticed this MASSIVE thread in response to the "Tiger mask" thread. I do take some responsibility for making it about firearms in there, but only stated that for the specific purpose of cougars and humans, I like to be armed, as I am legally daily. It became a bigger issue as it progressed into more of an opinion, accusative, and suggestive debate rather than the purpose of the original thread.

I read through this and I don't remember who said it (I think Jerry), but they summed it up best that debating politics on here isn't going to change anyone's mind, but it's good to get the people that dislike firearms or are uncomfortable with people carrying them to understand that it really is a super common thing, and not really a big deal like they might think. And same for the gun owners understanding the other perspective. As suggested, whatever side of the fence you're on, it usually doesn't matter as almost all of us you'll encounter are good law-abiding people with good intentions, firearm or not.

I'm glad to see the understanding and mostly sensible thinking I have after reading through this thread. That's the biggest thing that irritates me the most about anything is someone trying to push their agenda or beliefs on me without analyzing, rationally thinking, or understanding the topic. I'm very pleased to see this not happening much on a firearms specific thread; a topic that no doubt stirs emotion.

To throw in my .02 about this thread creation, I do agree it belongs in a gear section and any political nature, not including CURRENT regulations and laws, which apply to what you can carry/own/conceal and such, to be separated into an off topic thread as it degrades and takes up space of actual useful firearms and related info for those that can use it.

Cheers!
Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, fast is...

User avatar
Chase
Posts: 1264
Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Chase » September 7th, 2013, 5:10 pm

Interesting court case regarding open carry in Michigan.

Link

User avatar
Crusak
Posts: 3607
Joined: August 6th, 2009, 7:33 pm
Location: Oregon

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Crusak » September 7th, 2013, 9:39 pm

Chase wrote:Interesting court case regarding open carry in Michigan.

Link
Interesting. In Oregon I'm pretty sure there is not a requirement to carry identification for any purpose (other than when you're driving). You can walk down the street without your drivers license or permit or ID card and law enforcement can't charge you with a crime for failure to carry ID.

If this happened in Oregon I would think that the L.E.O. would need a better excuse to arrest the kid (but I can't say for sure... since I'm not a certified L.E.O.). But the whole thing could have been diffused by just producing some ID to prove you're 18 years old and then continuing on your merry way, open carrying your rifle. :D

It's different for concealed carry of a firearm. In Oregon you are required to have your concealed handgun license with you when you carry concealed - see ORS 166.292(2).
Jim's Hikes

Solvitur Ambulando

Shelly Ann
Posts: 1
Joined: September 15th, 2020, 8:57 am

Re: All Firearms Discussions in This Thread

Post by Shelly Ann » September 15th, 2020, 10:54 am

I know this is coming nearly 8 years after the first comment, but here is my take on carrying a sidearm while hiking and the accounting of three nearly deadly encounters where I had to use a firearm. My upbringing and life experiences have molded how I go into the bush here in Oregon. I no longer hunt, at least not since my last combat tour.

I have been stomping around the hills, forests and mountains of Oregon since I was old enough to walk on my own, or nearly 60+ years. When I began hunting with my father in the early 1960's, I began carrying a sidearm. We usually carried them as a weapon to use to give a wounded animal the coup de grace. As an young adult, after spending nearly 27 years in the military (1967-1994), with one combat tour, where my issued weapon was either the Colt M-1911 .45cal or the Beretta M-92 9mm pistol. Since then a sidearm has just been part of my hiking kit, along with the first aid kit, extra food, water and other survival items needed for an extended period in the bush.

During my years stomping around the wild-lands, I have had to use my sidearm during three near deadly encounters with the big predators found here in Oregon. My first experience with a big predator, was when I went out with my father, a state game officer and a group of hunters to track down and kill a bear that and been wounded by an out of state hunter. A hunter who did not track and finish off the wounded animal. The party was made up of three police officers and 11 hunters, counting me. The bear had mauled the state hunter who went out to track it down after the bear killed some livestock. The hunting party cornered it and we shot it. With a severe systemic infection and gangrene already set in, the meat could not be salvaged and used.

So, here are the accounts of my encounters with the big predators of Oregon:

First was when a wounded black bear charged the group I was with near Ten Mile Lake in 1974. A bear had stepped into a 'coon trap and when we crossed up wind of it, it charged us. We were forced to kill this animal at a very close range, about 25-30 feet, if we had hesitated one of us could have been mauled or worse. The weapon I was using was a revolver in .357 caliber. We did not let the animal go to waste by leaving it where it fell, one of the group members had a valid bear tag, so we tagged the animal and divided the meat amongst us. After the encounter I was shaking like a leaf

The second encounter was during a hike to Cat Mountain in the Umpqua National Forest. This encounter was with another black bear. This one was a mature male and it began a threat display and did several short mock charges. I had a hill to my rear and no climbable trees near by. The trail was lined by thick salal and rhododendron. My weapon on that day was my revolver, the distance from the animal was nearly 100 yards at first contact. When the bear came to within ~50 yards I fired my first shot, placing it into a stump by the tail. The next mock charge I placed a round into the dry debris in the trail in front of it, spraying dirt and wood splinters into its face, it then broke and went down into the canyon on the south side of the trail. A side trail, on the north side, led down to the road, before dropping down to the road, I checked the area for blood, to insure that I had not hit the animal.

The third and final encounter in the wild was during a hike near June Mountain, this hike I was alone with my dog, as we were following a road back to my p/u, we came upon a rock overhang. If it had not been for my dog's growl and my sudden alertness, I might not have noticed the movement on top of the big rock. A large male puma was getting ready to pounce. I assumed that the target was my dog not me, as he was ahead of me by a couple of yards. I was carrying a Beretta M-96 .40 caliber pistol as my emergency weapon. I stepped back, drew my pistol and placed a round into the face of the rock. The cat came off the ground and did a 180 and was gone back into the brush south of the road. I like to say, when I tell people of the encounter, that the cat did not stop until it reached Douglas County to the south.

I have had two big cats in my yards both in Drain and Roseburg. The one in Roseburg was of the most concern, as there were a bunch of kids playing basketball in the cul-de-sack in front of the house. It was after dark and I had just returned hoe from grocery shopping. I carried a coupe of bags in, then turned on the porch light. I then noticed the puma laying in my yard about 15-20 feet from the porch. I went back in, and got my magnum, I first picked up a big rock that was by my rock saw and threw it the cat yelling at it to scram. It just rolled back and stared at me, the second rock hit the animal, a Tom, it got up and lazily walked across my yard and the neighbor's, then disappeared in the overgrown stream bed on the other side of her property. At least I did not have to fire on that cat.

As for bear sprays, I found that the 2% capsaicin did not work all that good or at least on the bear we sprayed with it. It licked its muzzle off and acted like, it liked the stuff. The only deterrent spray that I have used with effect was the can of MACE that my father gave me. This was the old MACE that was made with the CN gas component, as used by the police back in the 1960's and 70's, during the antiwar and race riots. It took just a brief shot and the bear was stopped as if it had run into a brick wall. It went crashing through the brush away from us, could not use a sidearm during that encounter, we were visiting Yosemite NP at the time.

Have yet to have an untoward encounter with other human forest users. While on my log cross country bike rides (30-50 miles), I have defended against feral dogs and one pack of coyotes. Have only had to kill a feral dog once and it was charging me. Of the encounters that I have had, there were probably a dozen or more times these big predators where nearby, but I never saw them. I am now just shy my 70th B'day and I still get out as I can, I still carry a sidearm when in the bush, the biggest threat near where I live is more from the feral dogs, than the big tree predators in Oregon.

Thank you for letting me share these experiences. If you are contemplating carrying a sidearm during hikes, you need to be extremely alert to your surroundings, you need to be well trained in its use and in marksmanship, I qualified as an expert in my issued weapons. If you need to fire such a weapon, you need to be sure of the surroundings, where are all the members of your party, a bullet can travel nearly tree quarters of a mile and still be potentially lethal. During an encounter you cannot dither, you have to act 'right now.' You have to act as if it is second nature, an extension of your consciousness, so to speak. My initial firearms training was by our local Chief of Police, then the ongoing training in the military and refined during my last combat tour.

//es//An Avid Outdoors Lady.

Post Reply