1919 National Forest Brochure

This is a forum for trip reports that pre-date the Portland Hikers forum, trail photos from pre-digital era, or any other discussions that focus on trail history.
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Limey
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Joined: December 19th, 2012, 2:34 pm

1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by Limey » January 31st, 2015, 5:22 pm

After the two recent posts by Peabody and Payslee I thought I'd post this. I ran across it a few years ago and I'm sure some of you have seen it before but there are probably a lot of history buffs who haven't.
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui ... sequence=1
It's great reading, hope you enjoy. A lot of things have changed since this was written.

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Peabody
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Re: 1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by Peabody » February 1st, 2015, 10:34 am

Thanks for posting this. I haven't seen it before. I love all the period advice in the back of the pamphlet.

I might give the Army bread recipe a try.

ARMY BREAD.
1 quart flour.
1teaspoon salt.
1 tablespoon sugar.
4 teaspoons baking powder.
Mix the ingredients thoroughly and stir in enough cold water (about one and
one-third pints) to make a thick batter. Mix rapidly with a spoon until smooth
and pour out at once into a Dutch oven or baking pan. Bake about 45 minutes,
or until no dough adheres to a sliver stuck into the loaf
"I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.”
― E.B. White

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Grannyhiker
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Location: Gateway to the Columbia Gorge

Re: 1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by Grannyhiker » February 1st, 2015, 11:09 am

Leave out the baking powder and you have hardtack, favorite (?) food of Civil War soldiers, especially in the North (the South tended towards corn dodgers). Guaranteed to break a tooth unless soaked in coffee. That was done not only to make it chewable, but to remove the resident weevils, which floated to the top of the coffee cup and could be skimmed off.

I didn't read the entire bulletin, but very much enjoyed the parts I did read. For some reason the USFS seemed to be more welcoming in those days!
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey

Limey
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Joined: December 19th, 2012, 2:34 pm

Re: 1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by Limey » February 1st, 2015, 1:06 pm

Peabody, I too am tempted to try the army bread. Can you believe those lists of supplies and clothing? Made it easy to plan what you needed for your camping trip.
GH, yes, back then they encouraged you to stay, none of the 14 days and then get out like there is today.

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vibramhead
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Joined: November 15th, 2009, 10:52 am
Location: SW Portland

Re: 1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by vibramhead » February 1st, 2015, 3:57 pm

Grannyhiker wrote:to remove the resident weevils, which floated to the top of the coffee cup and could be skimmed off.
What? And lose all the protein?
Time spent hiking will not be deducted from your life.

GPS tracks on Wikiloc.

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miah66
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Joined: July 6th, 2009, 8:00 pm

Re: 1919 National Forest Brochure

Post by miah66 » February 2nd, 2015, 1:04 pm

Thanks for posting! I really enjoyed reading the old names and about the old wagon roads that require "teams" and some can "even be traveled by automobile"
"The top...is not the top" - Mile...Mile & a Half

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