Loony Hiker Prototypes

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kepPNW
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Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by kepPNW » August 9th, 2012, 9:44 am

I'm talking, of course, about the Corps of Discovery. Any other L&C fans, here? I really enjoy reading the Journals, especially when crossing the Dakotas or Montana. Talk about the original totally loony-tunes hike! :D

Anyway, some time ago I put together a KML (all secondary sources!) that shows their primary routes, and has a placemark for each campsite. When you click on a campsite, a balloon offers a direct link to the Journal entries (Moulton, ed.) for the day leading to that site. IOW, what they would've written that night, were they truly "fireside" writings. I found the Google Earth platform offers the best way to do a "reverse-lookup" of what they wrote at any specific place.

Image

The online edition, edited by Gary Moulton, is a real treasure as it includes all available texts, including those written by the Sgts. Gass, Ordway, and Whitehouse. If you've never read an abridged version of the Journals, any of those might be a better introduction, as this unabridged version includes details that can be tedious for an introductory text. But if you're already familiar with the general narrative, this is the ultimate reference.

Enjoy!
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Chase
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by Chase » August 9th, 2012, 10:33 am

Thanks for the link. Hadn't known about it.

The journals sure can be a tedious read (and I've only read the abridged version). A few weeks ago at Powell's they had the 12 or 13 volume set on sale with 2 copies left, but checking the website now I don't see it.

John Colter is the one I enjoy reading about the most. Sometime long ago I read a mountain men book with harrowing accounts of his adventures post-L&C.

Also, let's not forget Mr. Mackenzie's crossing of Canada before L&C. That trip must've been loonier than L&C.

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kepPNW
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by kepPNW » August 9th, 2012, 11:04 am

Yeah, you almost have to view the full Moulton edition as strictly a reference work. I was going to buy the set from Powell's a year or so ago, but then I found the online edition and that satisfied my urge (and my wife's feeling I was already consuming enough shelfspace!).

Looks like they still have a lot of copies at Powell's, though. Which is an amazing price! I have a friend who makes a living as a L&C Historian, who about had a tizz when I showed her that. She'd paid more than that for single volumes at Amazon!

I really loved the whole mountain man genre, real and imagined, growing up. Coulter, Joe Meek, Little Big Man, all those guys!

I need to spend more time with Mackenzie, though. Not as familiar with him or his geography, and it's said L&C not only based a lot of what they did on his explorations, but even went so far as to plagiarize his accounts.
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by Chase » August 9th, 2012, 12:19 pm

kepPNW wrote:Yeah, you almost have to view the full Moulton edition as strictly a reference work. I was going to buy the set from Powell's a year or so ago, but then I found the online edition and that satisfied my urge (and my wife's feeling I was already consuming enough shelfspace!).

Looks like they still have a lot of copies at Powell's, though. Which is an amazing price! I have a friend who makes a living as a L&C Historian, who about had a tizz when I showed her that. She'd paid more than that for single volumes at Amazon!

I really loved the whole mountain man genre, real and imagined, growing up. Coulter, Joe Meek, Little Big Man, all those guys!

I need to spend more time with Mackenzie, though. Not as familiar with him or his geography, and it's said L&C not only based a lot of what they did on his explorations, but even went so far as to plagiarize his accounts.
Good catch on finding that Powell's page. I don't know how I missed it. :oops:

Never found a good account of Mackenzie's exploration. Or any Canadian history that was written in a compelling way. I know the Canadian west has an interesting history with stories that must match the U.S.'s.

The Meek brothers are essential to Oregon's history, good call.

I wish I knew more about the trail that went from Vancouver, WA up to the Hudson Bay. Seems like the Brits should have exploited this and other routes the way the U.S. did to get numbers of emigrants to the territory. Then we'd all be Canadian.

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kepPNW
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by kepPNW » August 9th, 2012, 2:47 pm

I cheated. I actually had that Powell's page bookmarked in my "Wishlist" folder of bookmarks. :)

Looks like Mackenzie's journal is still available on Amazon. Nicandri said he was a better writer than Lewis, so it might be worth picking up. There was definitely some "inspiration" offered to L&C. Compare and contrast the graffiti left by each on the Pacific coast:
"Alexander Mackenzie, from Canada, by land, the twenty-second of July, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three."
"William Clark December 3rd 1805. By land from the U. States in 1804 & 1805."
I don't know much about that trapper route, either. But I think it's fundamentally different than the Oregon Trail, as it was mostly on water, right? Not as suitable for hauling the family along, I'm sure.
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by Chase » August 9th, 2012, 3:19 pm

kepPNW wrote:
Looks like Mackenzie's journal is still available on Amazon. Nicandri said he was a better writer than Lewis, so it might be worth picking up. There was definitely some "inspiration" offered to L&C.
Plus, there's a precedent on what do do if your party tarps out or gets cranky and wants to go home (page 309):
Image
The journals are available online (remember, this is old, public domain stuff).
kepPNW wrote: I don't know much about that trapper route, either. But I think it's fundamentally different than the Oregon Trail, as it was mostly on water, right? Not as suitable for hauling the family along, I'm sure.
Yeah, it was a whole different ball game, I imagine. Not starving farmers dealing and failed banks up there, too.

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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by kepPNW » August 9th, 2012, 3:40 pm

Chase wrote:Plus, there's a precedent on what do do if your party tarps out or gets cranky and wants to go home (page 309):
HA! Well, that is pretty different from the popular characterization of the L&C gang, isn't it?

Of course, cranky pants who wanted to go home were handled a bit differently by the military men...
William Clark, on 18-Aug-1804, wrote:a fine morning. Wind from the S. E. in the after part of the Day the Party with the Indians arrivd. we meet them under a Shade near the Boat and after a Short talk we gave them Provisions to eat & proceeded to the trail of Reed, he Confessed that he "Deserted & Stold a public Rifle Shot-pouch Powder & Bals" and requested we would be as favourable with him as we Could consistantly with our Oathes—which we were and only Sentenced him to run the Gantlet four times through the Party & that each man with 9 Swichies Should punish him and for him not to be considered in future as one of the Party—

The three principal Chiefs petitioned for Pardin for this man

After we explained the injurey Such men could doe them by false representation, & explang. the Customs of our Countrey they were all Satisfied with the propriety of the Sentence & was witness to the punishment. [5] after which we had Some talk with the Chiefs about the orrigan of the war between them & the Mahars &c. &c.— it commenced in this way i'e' in two of the Missouries Tribe resideing with the Ottoes went to the Mahars to Steel horses, they Killed them both which was a cause of revenge on the part of the Missouris & Ottoes, they also brought war on themselves [WC: Cap L. Birth day] [6] Nearly in the Same way with the Panea Loups [Skiri Pawnees] and they are greatly in fear of a just revenge from the Panies for takeing their Corn from the Pania Towns in their absence hunting this Summer.

the evening was Closed with an extra Gill of Whiskey & a Dance untill 11 oClock.
Pretty sure that was the last attempt at desertion they faced.
Karl
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Chase
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Re: Loony Hiker Prototypes

Post by Chase » July 4th, 2013, 6:16 pm

kepPNW wrote:I'm talking, of course, about the Corps of Discovery. Any other L&C fans, here? I really enjoy reading the Journals, especially when crossing the Dakotas or Montana. Talk about the original totally loony-tunes hike! :D

Anyway, some time ago I put together a KML (all secondary sources!) that shows their primary routes, and has a placemark for each campsite. When you click on a campsite, a balloon offers a direct link to the Journal entries (Moulton, ed.) for the day leading to that site. IOW, what they would've written that night, were they truly "fireside" writings. I found the Google Earth platform offers the best way to do a "reverse-lookup" of what they wrote at any specific place.

Image

The online edition, edited by Gary Moulton, is a real treasure as it includes all available texts, including those written by the Sgts. Gass, Ordway, and Whitehouse. If you've never read an abridged version of the Journals, any of those might be a better introduction, as this unabridged version includes details that can be tedious for an introductory text. But if you're already familiar with the general narrative, this is the ultimate reference.

Enjoy!
You can now see one of Meriweather Lewis's paystubs at the Historical Society!

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