a metallic mystery

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Chip Down
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a metallic mystery

Post by Chip Down » August 19th, 2019, 4:22 am

Okay, enough of these botanical inquiries, let's look at something anthropogenic.
This pic came from Hood, slightly above the head of Heather Canyon, 7600'. A couple of these I've seen before, but not together. At top center, the amorphous copper-colored shards are typical of those seen all over in the upper reaches of Meadows ski area. Notice the machined grooves/teeth on one of them.
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RobFromRedland
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by RobFromRedland » August 19th, 2019, 4:36 am

Chip Down wrote:
August 19th, 2019, 4:22 am
Okay, enough of these botanical inquiries, let's look at something anthropogenic.
This pic came from Hood, slightly above the head of Heather Canyon, 7600'. A couple of these I've seen before, but not together. At top center, the amorphous copper-colored shards are typical of those seen all over in the upper reaches of Meadows ski area. Notice the machined grooves/teeth on one of them.
Could those be the remains of concussion shells they use to control avalanches?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: WOW-What a ride!

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retired jerry
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by retired jerry » August 19th, 2019, 4:54 am

where's the airplane crash that goes along with that? :lol:

johnspeth
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by johnspeth » August 19th, 2019, 7:19 am

I'm certain that these metal garbage piles come from Meadows' Howitzer, used for avalanche control. The ski area has a reckless policy with regard to their use of the Howitzer. They have pinpoint artillery positions that are used according to where they want the shell to likely hit the earth. The "likely" term is important because their policy allows for shooting in any weather, including weather that blocks the sight line to the target. They fire and hope for the best result. Hopefully the best result won't also include the worst result of injuring somebody in the target area. It is indeed a reckless policy and the garbage left behind just adds to the affront. Of course, this is all with forest service approval. A death due to an artillery hit on Mt Hood is a matter of statistical certainty if this policy persists long enough. Wear your helmet, Chip, when you're in the area :(

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Chip Down
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by Chip Down » August 19th, 2019, 5:22 pm

I was pretty sure it had to be avalanche-control ordinance. It doesn't look at like what I would expect, but no other explanation makes sense. Interesting to finally see these all together, in a huge swath, not scattered as they usually are.

Editorial: Mount Hood Meadows is a disgusting assembly of subhuman dirtbags. I loathe and despise those contemptible jackasses. I wish I could say how I really feel, but I'd almost certainly be edited. Oh, and I feel the same about the USFS that issues their permit. And Timberline too.

johnspeth
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by johnspeth » August 19th, 2019, 5:48 pm

Chip Down wrote:
August 19th, 2019, 5:22 pm
I was pretty sure it had to be avalanche-control ordinance. It doesn't look at like what I would expect, but no other explanation makes sense. Interesting to finally see these all together, in a huge swath, not scattered as they usually are.
Howitzer aiming is surprisingly accurate. The US has been lobbing bombs for hundreds of years so excellent accuracy is expected. That's probably why the shrapnel is not widely distributed. It should be easy cleanup after the problem is publicly exposed.
Chip Down wrote:
August 19th, 2019, 5:22 pm
Editorial: Mount Hood Meadows is a disgusting assembly of subhuman dirtbags.
Agreed for a number of reasons.

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retired jerry
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by retired jerry » August 19th, 2019, 6:37 pm

you guys :)

that produced a healthful belly laugh, thanks

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Water
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by Water » August 19th, 2019, 9:44 pm

Chip Down wrote:
August 19th, 2019, 5:22 pm
Editorial: Mount Hood Meadows is a disgusting assembly of subhuman dirtbags. I loathe and despise those contemptible jackasses. I wish I could say how I really feel, but I'd almost certainly be edited. Oh, and I feel the same about the USFS that issues their permit. And Timberline too.
imo i have never bothered to 'test' Meadows in winter but I hear they are especially gestapo about acting like it is private property you're trespassing on..

..that said tline does skewer the mountain (I mean both areas do too, but tline even more prominently with the magic mile and palmer lifts) in regards to 'wilderness', however (and maybe it is my times of year I'm up there) have been pretty laissez faire to me as a skier, going uphill in their fresh groom before open, or skiing down it etc. Once a patroler at top of palmer told me not to be under the lift fall line early cause they push stuff down (and they do..), and one time 10yr ago a snow cat driver was especially unhelpful when i flagged him after running into silcox to report my climbing partner snapped something in his ankle and couldn't walk down from top of palmer.. it was a few days before the party of 3 died on the reid. One of those high pressure early december winter weeks in the 20s in portland but no inversion up high, it was ~7 degrees when we started at 5am and we went up leuths slow as shit with that cold and brutal wind. Descended just before sunset, this was pre-ski days for me. Anyways ran into silcox and asked if they had a radio because someone was hurt and they just sneered and said NO they don't have a radio..or anything. total bullshit. so shortly after on my way down to tline i flagged a cat driver and he was so dismissive. Mind you the mountain is empty and darkness is in 20 minutes, it's single digits and gusting to 30~..

Ok so all that said I don't think meadows=timberline in the attitude. ski patrol has been super helpful in a separate situation a friend fell and skied back down but still needed to be attended to. not that i've talked up tline at this point :lol:


ski patrol also uses hand charges, like grenades..explosives with timers. could be parts of that.
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Chip Down
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by Chip Down » August 20th, 2019, 3:57 am

Water wrote:
August 19th, 2019, 9:44 pm
imo i have never bothered to 'test' Meadows in winter but I hear they are especially gestapo about acting like it is private property you're trespassing on..
I was once admonished for coming down the mountain after sunset, in October I think. I was told I should be off their territory by dark, as if there was a curfew. Bizarre. Interesting thing is, he was fairly courteous as he made up his BS rule (unless it is a real rule, but I doubt that).

johnspeth
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Re: a metallic mystery

Post by johnspeth » August 20th, 2019, 5:37 am

About 10 years ago I did a little poking at the forest service and at MHM to get some insight into the legal basis for MHM's we-own-it-so-stay-out attitude that persists today. I obtained two key docs: the operating plan and the ski area permit. Click on the links to get the docs which I obtained at the time. I'm providing them for reference. The operating plan herein is outdated and I think MHM probably has updated it and filed it with the forest service. Contact either organization if you want updates. Both were cooperative when I requested the docs. I'll caution you to keep your motives secret when requesting.

A phone discussion with the FS person who manages the permit (name forgotten by me) left me feeling uneasy. I asked the person a few questions about why MHM appears to operate counter to what the plan and permit allow. His answer was along the line of "Well that's what we decided". I understood "we" to mean FS and MHM managers and maybe lawyers. I believe that nobody has materially challenged MHM with regard to access, a sore point for me. MHM was challenged about developing the Cooper Spur area and appears to have dropped plans there after the challenge. MHM was also challenged about the use of the Howitzer on the wilderness boundary. The FS sided with MHM in that matter. It's evidence of how activism can work when used.

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