Algae/kelp ID

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adamschneider
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Algae/kelp ID

Post by adamschneider » March 5th, 2019, 5:36 pm

Anyone good with coastal marine plants? I found this thing growing in the tidepools at Boiler Bay (just north of Depoe Bay), and I don't even know where to start IDing it. The long stem looks like kelp, but what's with the very round leaf? I know I should have tried to get a photo of the roots/holdfast, but I didn't. Mea culpa.

53485363_10156511533658052_4525654232895848448_n.jpg

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bobcat
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Re: Algae/kelp ID

Post by bobcat » March 7th, 2019, 8:41 am

Is the blade really round? There are a limited number of brown algae that inhabit Oregon tide pools, so I'd go with kombu (Laminaria setchellii). The single stiff stipe is distinctive; a kombu blade is deeply cleft but may seem to float as an entire unit. Other brown tide pool algae with single wide blades are sessile (as far as I can figure out).

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adamschneider
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Re: Algae/kelp ID

Post by adamschneider » March 7th, 2019, 9:36 am

I think you're definitely onto something. Yes, the blade was mostly round, with a slight notch/depression at the end. Maybe this one was just getting started.

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adamschneider
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Re: Algae/kelp ID

Post by adamschneider » March 7th, 2019, 11:39 am

Maybe Laminaria sinclairii is a better match? Check out this entry on iNaturalist.

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bobcat
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Re: Algae/kelp ID

Post by bobcat » March 8th, 2019, 11:54 am

I think that fits your description! And it appears to be very common in Oregon.

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