Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

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xrp
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by xrp » September 11th, 2017, 11:42 am

Bosterson wrote:Meanwhile, what exactly does this mean, and is it a good thing or something that threatens the strength of the Gorge's wilderness designation? His reference to the "value of the timber" makes me think it's a bad thing. Is "reforestation" something that's even necessary?
[Oregon Republican congressman Greg] Walden, a former chairman of the House Resources Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health, said the Gorge’s status as a National Scenic Area means there are barriers to quick reforestation. That’s a problem, he said, because timber with any potential monetary value could end up going to waste if crews can’t begin the work of replanting burned areas quickly.

“What I hear is that if this were state land or county land or private land, the land managers would be in right away,” Walden said. “Too often on our federal lands, the process is such that it could take a year or two, and by that point you’ve lost the value of the timber. And so you lose the financial resource that we need to be able to pay for the restoration work.”
Pure speculation on my part -- Two fold.

First is the bureaucratic process of doing almost anything fed-wise? Paperwork/studies/etc, "experts" from DC and the time required to complete all of that (think about the Columbia River Crossing, I guess?)? As opposed to Oregonians managing that themselves?

Secondly on potential timber value -- maybe there is some value to fallen/damaged timber that has a timeline of value. For example, if the fallen/damaged timber is harvested within 6 months, some/much/most of it could be salvaged for various wood products (paper? timber? yard mulch?). As time passes as rain and critters take their toll, the wood becomes worthless for wood products.

aircooled
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by aircooled » September 11th, 2017, 11:49 am

Don Nelsen wrote:The west wind has cleared the air so I headed out to the Gorge today for some views.
Great pix - thanks, Don!

Looking at the condition of Oneonta canyon, it's amazing that anything survived at Nesika. The ridge above Waespe Point (burnt) will no longer provide the protection from winter winds it once did. I'll be curious to see Waespe Point. The view will certainly have changed.

Angel's Rest: Appears the private pee spots in the scrub on top will be gone. But we may have great 360 degree views for a while now!

That ridgeline shot looks like the ridge where Cougar Rock Trail meets Elevator Shaft. That area will take on a whole new character now.

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Don Nelsen
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Don Nelsen » September 11th, 2017, 1:21 pm

aircooled wrote:
Don Nelsen wrote:The west wind has cleared the air so I headed out to the Gorge today for some views.
Great pix - thanks, Don!

Looking at the condition of Oneonta canyon, it's amazing that anything survived at Nesika. The ridge above Waespe Point (burnt) will no longer provide the protection from winter winds it once did. I'll be curious to see Waespe Point. The view will certainly have changed.

Angel's Rest: Appears the private pee spots in the scrub on top will be gone. But we may have great 360 degree views for a while now!

That ridgeline shot looks like the ridge where Cougar Rock Trail meets Elevator Shaft. That area will take on a whole new character now.
Here are a few more pics I took yesterday afternoon:

Nesika area doesn't look too bad from St. Cloud:
Image

Lots of spot fires still burning in the area above the 400 up to Devil's Rest:
Image

The Stairway Trail got hit but not too badly: (The next ridge to the west from Angel's Rest)
Image

Image

Cascade Locks can't seem to get a break:
Image

On the WA side, a firebreak has been cleared for 2/3 mile through High Valley on the west side of Archer Mt.:
Image

Another has been made below the cliffs in a NW to SE direction on the west side of the west prominence:
Image

To top that off, the gasline cut got a nice resurfacing:
Image

dn
"Everything works in the planning stage".

VanMarmot
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by VanMarmot » September 11th, 2017, 1:34 pm

Bosterson wrote:
Meanwhile, what exactly does this mean, and is it a good thing or something that threatens the strength of the Gorge's wilderness designation? His reference to the "value of the timber" makes me think it's a bad thing. Is "reforestation" something that's even necessary?
[Oregon Republican congressman Greg] Walden, a former chairman of the House Resources Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health, said the Gorge’s status as a National Scenic Area means there are barriers to quick reforestation. That’s a problem, he said, because timber with any potential monetary value could end up going to waste if crews can’t begin the work of replanting burned areas quickly.

“What I hear is that if this were state land or county land or private land, the land managers would be in right away,” Walden said. “Too often on our federal lands, the process is such that it could take a year or two, and by that point you’ve lost the value of the timber. And so you lose the financial resource that we need to be able to pay for the restoration work.”
This is that same old call for salvage logging - as in: "Now that you've burned your forest down, we'll help you restore it only if you first let us cut down what's left for a profit." So we'd clear-cut and then replant the Gorge as a glorified tree farm. Hmmm. The premise here is that "restoration" won't occur in a way both favorable to, and fast enough for, humans without the helping hand of the logging industry. This is nonsense - natural restoration will proceed just fine - albiet more slowly and in its own direction - without our help. The Gorge at the end of the 19th Century and the start of the 20th Century was a logged-over mess (think of all those old logging railroads Don Nelsen has found) but it came back - it just takes time, lots of time.

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Bosterson
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Bosterson » September 11th, 2017, 2:18 pm

Don Nelsen wrote: Cascade Locks can't seem to get a break:
Image
I believe this was a controlled burn to protect the town. They issued warnings that it would look like the fire was getting really intense over the weekend, but firefighters would be responsible.

From Inciweb:
Burn-out operations are also continuing near the town of Cascade Locks. This may temporarily increase smoke levels in the afternoon, but will greatly assist in the protection of structures and private property.
Will hike off trail for fun.

Chazz
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Chazz » September 11th, 2017, 2:39 pm

VanMarmot wrote:
This is nonsense - natural restoration will proceed just fine - albiet more slowly and in its own direction - without our help. The Gorge at the end of the 19th Century and the start of the 20th Century was a logged-over mess (think of all those old logging railroads Don Nelsen has found) but it came back - it just takes time, lots of time.
Is it illegal for trail groups or citizens to assist in replanting efforts? Especially around sections of trail where the organic material has been completely burned off? I am already anticipating taking part in some trail work when things settle down and the professionals have had a chance to analyze and evaluate where the most work is needed to keep the trail system in the gorge usable.

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Bosterson
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Bosterson » September 11th, 2017, 3:10 pm

Ah, here we go.
Dawn Stender, a trail crew supervisor for the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, tells The Oregonian/OregonLive on Monday that trails will likely be off-limits until spring because of landslide risk and fire damage.
http://koin.com/2017/09/11/columbia-gor ... or-months/
Will hike off trail for fun.

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Chase
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Chase » September 11th, 2017, 4:49 pm

Expect to see a three-fold increase in hiking on the WA side in the next year. So if you thought Dog got crowded early before, you will be in for a surprise.

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Dave Rappoccio
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Dave Rappoccio » September 11th, 2017, 5:17 pm

Don Nelsen wrote:The west wind has cleared the air so I headed out to the Gorge today for some views.

Angel's Rest
Image


Many of the ridgelines on the Oregon side look like this:
Image


Looking directly up Horsetail Canyon with Oneonta Canyon on the right.
Image


dn
Man Angels Rest is going to have great views for that final half mile if this part of the trail stays intact.

Looks like a lot of ridges will have nice new views though, that's kind of exciting.

Rock of Ages ridge might be gone for good if the landslides hit hard. The trail to the backbone is already steep and slippery, this is going to really mess up the stability.

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Guy
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Re: Eagle Creek Trail (Gorge) Closed by Fire (July 5)

Post by Guy » September 11th, 2017, 5:33 pm

Thanks Don, these are the best most informative photos I've seen so far.

Boy that burn on the East side of the Oneonta Canyon looks bad, If stuff start rolling down there Oneonta could soon be a very different place.

It is encouraging to see the less that 100% burn in other places though.
hiking log & photos.
Ad monte summa aut mors

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