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Sandy River Crossing

From Oregon Hikers Field Guide

Crossing options in 2016 (bobcat)
The former temporary bridge across the Sandy River (not replaced after 2014) (Jerry Adams)

Description

The crossing off the Sandy River via the Sandy River Trail #770 has seen a series of "permanent" as well as temporary footbridges over the years, each one destroyed by the river on one of its flash flood rampages. The Forest Service has now declared that it will make the effort no more, and hikers into this area, part of the Mt. Hood Wilderness since 2009, will have to pick their own way. Because the river undermines its banks on a regular basis, there are usually toppled trees that offer an assist if you are game for a balancing act (In 2016, for example, there were at least three such log bridges in the crossing area). If you are not so inclined, then a ford may be in order (See Tips for Crossing Streams).

Bear in mind that there have been some fatalities at this location, the last in 2014, when a hiker was swept off the last footbridge and drowned. Do not cross if the water looks dangerously high: glacial silt will conceal the actual bottom and also the rolling rocks that are pushed downstream may cause you to stumble into the spate.

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Contributors

Oregon Hikers Field Guide is built as a collaborative effort by its user community. While we make every effort to fact-check, information found here should be considered anecdotal. You should cross-check against other references before planning a hike. Trail routing and conditions are subject to change. Please contact us if you notice errors on this page.

Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this field guide is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this field guide. All content posted on the field guide becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.