Home  •   Field Guide  •   Forums  •   Unread Posts  •   Maps  •   Find a Hike!  •    Register  •   Search  •  
Jump to:  
Login  | 

Board index » Gear & Goodies » Photography




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: New DSLR - Lens must haves?
 Post Posted: November 24th, 2017, 7:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:31 pm
Posts: 476
I ordered my first real camera! It's a canon 80d DSLR. It came with a EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens & an EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens. I know virtually nothing about photography and have used my cell phone the last 5 years. Before that I used low-end point and shoot cameras.

Are there any other focal lengths that are consider must haves for mostly landscapes with the occasional wildlife photos? The number of different ones available is overwhelming and I don't know what I'll actually use.

Is processing software necessary? Recommendations? I'm not likely to ever get any sellable photos but I'd like to be able to make prints for myself on occasion.

Thanks for the help!
Dan


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New DSLR - Lens must haves?
 Post Posted: November 24th, 2017, 8:12 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: May 28th, 2008, 10:03 pm
Posts: 2528
Location: Portland, OR
I'm a Nikon gal, not Canon, but I can tell you that the 18–135 is a good versatile lens and will work great for landscapes. The 55-250 will be great for wildlife. I do recommend a wide angle zoom lens. When you go someplace like the Rocky Mountains or the Wallowa Mountains, you should get a wide-angle lens so you can fit the scene into your shots. Looks like Canon has a EF-S 10–18 mm STM lens.

Depending on the type of photigraphy you want to do, you may want to invest in a good tripod. It comes in handy for low-light situations, or if you want to do a slow shutter speed with a creek or waterfall. You should definitely get a circular polarizing filter all of your lenses.

You will want some editing software, even if it's just to do basic things like boost the color, or sharpen the image. Adobe Photoshop Elements is a great bargain. It does a lot of stuff, but it doesn't cost an arm and a leg, and it doesn't have the steep learning curve that the full version of Photoshop has.

Good luck, and I look forward to seeing your shots posted here on the forums. :)

_________________
Cheryl

"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder

My adventure blog
Hiking videos
justpeachy on Instagram


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New DSLR - Lens must haves?
 Post Posted: November 25th, 2017, 4:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:31 pm
Posts: 476
Thanks for the suggestions! I'll pick up a 10-18 and a polarizing filter on cyber Monday and hit the trails!


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New DSLR - Lens must haves?
 Post Posted: December 5th, 2017, 9:33 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 29th, 2011, 6:55 am
Posts: 612
If you want to try wide angle landscape or night pictures this lens is pretty popular. Due to quality control, you might have to exchange it for a another one, but once you get a good copy, it is a great lens.

Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Lens For Canon EF.

For $299 (manual focus) & $399 (auto focus) it is a great deal.

_________________
The mountains are calling and I must go.
John Muir


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New DSLR - Lens must haves?
 Post Posted: December 15th, 2017, 4:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 22nd, 2012, 12:47 pm
Posts: 117
I just came across this thread. I hope that I am not too late.
The Canon 80d is definitely a "real camera." It has an excellent sensor and lots of features. To get take advantage of the features of your new camera, I recommend that you download the Canon online manual. It is much more comprehensive than the printed manual that came with your camera.
I agree that Photoshop Elements would be good for you to get. While Elements is not nearly as complex as Photoshop, it is not simple to use. I believe that it would be worthwhile to buy a book on how best to use the software. I have been using the " Missing Manual' series and have found them to be very helpful.
If you are inclined to take photos in RAW, Cannon offers Digital Photo Professional for processing RAW images. It is free. You can download an online DPP manual and Canon offers some excellent tutorials on using the software. If you are hesitant about using RAW, you can set your camera to take RAW and JPEG images simultaneously and see which you prefer or you can continue to use both.
Have fun with your new camera.


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

Board index » Gear & Goodies » Photography


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Disclaimer: This is a free, private forum and opinions posted by its members do not necessarily reflect those of Trailkeepers of Oregon. Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this forum is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this forum. All content posted on the forum becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.