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Enright

From Oregon Hikers Field Guide

The water tank at Enright (Steve Hart)
The steel remains of a wooden boxcar (Steve Hart)
Stranded log cars (Steve Hart)

Description

Enright is a former town on an abandoned railroad line deep in the Oregon Coast Range. There are two houses here and the land just south of the tracks here is private property. Please respect the owners privacy.

The east end of the area is marked by Tunnel 36. The switch at the east end of the set out track hangs in the air over the river. The river washed out the ground beneath it during the winter of 2007, when the entire line was damaged to badly to repair.

There are about 15 log cars on the siding, all of them stranded here forever.

West of the log cars, look for the steel skeleton of a wooden boxcar in the woods. This car might have been a bunk car, left here to provide temporary housing for a maintenance gang.

A steam era water tank towers over the track near the west end of the old siding. Enright was the base of a helper district heading up the hill to Cochran. Water from Tank Creek was held here to fill the steam engines of the road engines and helpers before they assaulted the hill.

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Contributors

Oregon Hikers Field Guide is built as a collaborative effort by its user community. While we make every effort to fact-check, information found here should be considered anecdotal. You should cross-check against other references before planning a hike. Trail routing and conditions are subject to change. Please contact us if you notice errors on this page.

Hiking is a potentially risky activity, and the entire risk for users of this field guide is assumed by the user, and in no event shall Trailkeepers of Oregon be liable for any injury or damages suffered as a result of relying on content in this field guide. All content posted on the field guide becomes the property of Trailkeepers of Oregon, and may not be used without permission.